Mexican Association of Real Estate Professionals demands Professional Realtors

Mexican Association of Real Estate Professionals demands Professional Realtors

Feb 22, 2016

Real estate buyer confidence makes a big leap forward in Mexico and professionalism takes center stage for many realtors during 2016. This means buyers will be able to become new property owners without hassles or hesitation. AMPI, the Mexican Association of Real Estate Professionals, continues to push for real estate license requirements. The board wants to be sure that everyone selling real estate meets their business standards. Mexico has had almost no regulations on who can act as a real estate agent. Now AMPI is taking their profession to the next level because foreign buyers expect it.  Asociación Mexicana de Profesionales Inmobiliarios (Mexican Association of Real Estate Professionals) “You have to remain vigilant when dealing with various property agents,” says Edward Padalinski, Broker and Estate Agent with Ron Morgan Properties in Puerto Vallarta and Bucerías, Jalisco, Mexico, and AMPI officer, “I review all local listings for MLS (Multiple Listing Service) to make sure agents are complying with AMPI rules and regulations.” Edward serves as part of the MLS Service Committee. He is always evaluating properties and checking to make sure things like tax identification numbers are current and that nothing gets put into MLS without the proper paperwork. “This type of oversight is a great thing for the industry,” says Edward. “It gives buyers assurance in a very competitive market. AMPI also provides training for its members, so there’s a great system of checks and balances.” Edward also teach the computer software, FLEX, classes. Although the government has been slow to respond with real estate licensing requirements, AMPI has taken a leading role by offering courses and certificates, and even collaborating with government agencies to offer a professional university degree in Mexico real estate. The AMPI board has been pushing for real estate license requirements in all states and may be well on the way to getting at least half the Mexican states to comply during 2016. Mexico has long been overlooked as a retirement haven, but with proper promotion and integrity many will find that they can retire in luxury without spending a fortune. Over the past decade the number of buyers new to Mexican real estate and Mexico as a retirement destination, has...

Group of Volunteers Build 25 Houses in 2 Days from Tijuana to Ensenada

Group of Volunteers Build 25 Houses in 2 Days from Tijuana to Ensenada

May 28, 2015

ROSARITO BEACH — Cipriano Morfin-Ramos moved his wife and their two young children, soon to be three, out of their one-room, dirt-floored hut Saturday and into their new house on a concrete slab with two bedrooms, a kitchen and a bathroom. Before he did, he thanked the group of about 20 volunteers, some from as far as Canada, for spending their Memorial Day weekend building his home, which is right beside his old one. “Wherever you come from, tell them there is a family here that really values what you do,” he told the volunteers in Spanish, as the green paint was drying on the door frame of his new abode. More than 500 volunteers from across the United States and several other countries spent the weekend helping the San Diego-based nonprofit Homes of Hope celebrate its 25th anniversary by building 25 small houses for 25 Mexican families from Tijuana to Ensenada. Homes of Hope, an interdenominational faith-based charity, has built more than 5,000 houses in 19 countries since it began in 1990, said founder Sean Lambert. Most of the houses, about 4,000 of them, were built just below the border in Baja California. “We are extremely spiritual,” Lambert said. “But that’s not a qualification for getting a house.” The recipients must have a family, must own the land the house is built on, and must have a job, he said. And they must help build their own house. The structures are wired for electricity and plumbed for running water and sewers, but the utilities are not provided. Most of the owners eventually get electricity, which costs them about $350 to hook up, Lambert said, but few can afford to get running water and plumbing. Homes of Hope helps the “poorest of the poor,” he said. The organization works to make people self-sufficient and takes time to find families who need a hand, not a handout. “You have to have the right giving formula,” Lambert said. “If you don’t have the right giving formula, you end up hurting people.” Apparently, the formula works, he said, because a survey of 400 homes the group built shows more than 90 percent are still owned and occupied...