Federal Government and Electricity Federal Commission harm Baja California industrials

Federal Government and Electricity Federal Commission harm Baja California industrials

Jan 15, 2018

Shameful agreement of the SHCP (a Mexican IRS) which increases more than 10% the industrial and commercial electricity fee, for Baja California industrials, said Lawmaker Luz Argelia Paniagua Figueroa, who also said: “It’s sad and pitiful the Federal Government to make such decisions, without any hesitation,  severely affecting the competitiveness and development in Baja CAlifrnia, but this won’t stay like this, we will start a blockade to revert this determination which harms all Baja California residents”, said Paniagua. The increase determination was publiched in the Fedweral Official Journal as of November 30th of 2017, anabling the SHCP to determine a mechanism to fix the electrical power fees, different from that of the Energy Regulation Commission. Last January 12th, Tomas Sibaja, Aerospace cluster President, sent an email to President Penia Nieto and the Secretary of Energy, stating his disagreement regarding the Federal Electricity Commission (CFE in Spanish) increasing electricity fees which has caused serious problems to the local industries and will worsen this year with such high price to pay for electricity, something that began last...

Meade threatens top Mexico’s news website with legal suit

Meade threatens top Mexico’s news website with legal suit

Jan 14, 2018

ALFREDO AZCARATE VARELA THE BAJA POST/EDITOR The campaign team of Jose Meade, PRI pre-candidate for Mexico’s 2018 presidential election stated that they are considering the possibility to sue ANIMAL POLITICO one of Mexico’s leading journalistic media organizations because of a note published as of January 10th, where ANIMAL POLITICO reported that the Federation Supreme Auditor (ASF in Spanish) had submitted three legal suits at the Republic General Attorney (PGR in Spanish) regarding a 540 million pesos embezzlement when Meade was in charge of the Social Development Department (SEDESOL in Spanish). Meade’s campaign team sent a letter in response to the journalistic note, which was published by ANIMAL POLITICO on January 11th, despite the information versions stating that the suit is a fact, there hasn’t been any legal procedure against the website, ARTICLE 19 has called this “ . . .an intent to inhibit the press . . .”. The answer of ANIMAL POLITICO signed by the portal Director goes as follows: “Summarizing, the letter that Mr. Meade’s legal team sent, we deem it should be sent to the Federation Supreme Auditor. ANIMAL POLITICO only reported that there were legal procedures and what the audits said”. Daniel Moreno. ANIMAL POLITICO General...

FORBES: It is time for Mexico to focus on Asia (and think less about the United States)

FORBES: It is time for Mexico to focus on Asia (and think less about the United States)

Jan 12, 2018

According to Forbes.com, the way the United States closes its economy and ceases to guarantee world peace, forces business leaders to turn to a region that has its own charm. 2018 starts under the sign of uncertainty. An uncertainty to which, in truth, we are already getting used to. In less than two years, an impressive number of events have suddenly changed the world order. It is clear that we are going through a period of transition, but where are we heading to? From the current chaos, the world system features two characteristics:   The first is that there is, at the moment, no superpower capable of taking charge of global security. Among the failures of Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria, and the mismanagement of the Korean question, the US fails to maintain its Pax Americana over the world.   The second characteristic is that the countries of the first world are affected by problems that until yesterday defined the developing countries. Between unrestrained populism, religious and ethnic tensions, and the impoverishment of the middle class, it is no longer the second world (the underdeveloped or emerging countries) that has approached the first world, but it is the first world that is approaching the second.   While the first world suffers, the developing countries continue their race towards economic growth (albeit at different speeds). These countries seem to have definitively renounced any ambition for democratic development. Transitions do not march towards democracy and therefore it would be better to define them as “hybrid regimes”, since they stably combine an imperfect democracy with authoritarian profiles. In addition, as it can be observed in China, liberal and democratic rights are not an essential condition for growth. The Chinese economy grows at a very high rate while maintaining an authoritarian political structure. 2018 will be a year of great opportunities, but also of great challenges as growth in Asia shapes unprecedented geopolitical scenarios. Entrepreneurs in Mexico must become aware of the change and look to the Far East. Source:...

Tancítaro, “avocado capital of the world” has become an independent city-state: NYT

Tancítaro, “avocado capital of the world” has become an independent city-state: NYT

Jan 10, 2018

According to the New York Times, some Mexican towns are quietly breaking away, as they loose faith in the State. TANCÍTARO, Michoacán— The road to this agricultural town winds through the slums and cartel-controlled territory of Michoacán, ground zero for Mexico’s drug war, before arriving at a sight so strange it can seem like a mirage. Fifteen-foot stone turrets are staffed by men whose green uniforms belong to no official force. Beyond them, a statue of an avocado bears the inscription “avocado capital of the world.” And beyond the statue is Tancítaro, an island of safety and stability amid the most violent period in Mexico’s history. Local orchard owners, who export over $1 million in avocados per day, mostly to the United States, underwrite what has effectively become an independent city-state. Self-policing and self-governing, it is a sanctuary from drug cartels as well as from the Mexican state. Click here for full article on The New York Times Source: The New York...

Mexican drug cartels infiltrate Mexico City Airport operations: El Universal

Mexican drug cartels infiltrate Mexico City Airport operations: El Universal

Jan 3, 2018

MEXICO CITY — Criminal organizations in Mexico, such as the Sinaloa Cartel, the Jalisco New Generation Cartel, and the Beltrán-Leyva Cartel, have expanded their operation networks at the airports of the country in order to smuggle drugs and money with the help of pilots, ground handlers, private security personnel, flight attendants, and even members of the Federal Police. A report by the Federal Police confirms that while seizures do take place at Mexican airports, these are only a fraction of the total amounts moved every day in commercial flights and airport terminals, according to El Universal newspaper. They have acknowledged that in some cases seized cargoes are distractions so bigger shipments can move undetected. The main center of operations of drug cartels is the International Mexico City Airport (AICM). According to the information, criminal organizations have operation networks involving drug couriers and mules and airport staff. Drug cartels have operated at Mexican airports for over 20 years. People arrested for drug trafficking have used airlines such as Iberia, Volaris, Copa Airlines, Air France, Aeroméxico, and Mexicana de Aviación. Pursuant to the Federal Police and the Mexican Office of the Attorney General (PGR), high-risk flights are those coming mainly from Peru, Panama, Colombia, the United States, Costa Rica, El Salvador, and Spain. This is how the International Mexico City Airport becomes the link for moving drugs between Central and South America to the United States and European countries. Most common trafficked illegal substances are cocaine, heroin, crystal Meth, ephedrine, fentanyl, and pseudoephedrine. Between 2007 and early 2016, at least 256 cargos of illegal drugs have been seized at the Mexico City International Airport. Not only in Mexico City In March 2016 at the International Airport of Cancún in Quintana Roo, a woman was arrested trying to smuggle three kilograms of cocaine hidden in the false bottom of her suitcase. In the airport of Guadalajara, Jalisco, Federal Police members arrested last month a woman who had tried to board a flight carrying 22 cocaine capsules inside her and in October, another who had swallowed 41. In Tijuana, Baja California, 9 kilograms of crystal meth were hidden inside two wooden crosses covered in plaster. In Mérdia, Yucatán,...

Leobardo Ramos is known as the “Donald Trump” of Oaxaca

Leobardo Ramos is known as the “Donald Trump” of Oaxaca

Dec 28, 2017

The town of Chahuites, Oaxaca, is a sleepy little village surrounded by mango farms. A line of train tracks cuts through the southern edge of town. Chahuites is in an isolated part of southern Oaxaca, about 170 miles north of the Guatemalan border. Migrants from Central America used to just pass through town riding on top of La Bestia, the train migrants traditionally traveled on across Mexico. But now immigration agents patrol the train, forcing migrants to walk northward along the railroad tracks. “People wait by the railroad with machetes and guns to rob migrants,” said Juan Vicente, a migrant from El Salvador who works at a construction site in Chahuites, “then they steal whatever you got.” … Leobardo Ramos burst onto the political scene in Chahuites last year with an ambitious plan to solve crime. He ran for municipal president promising to clean up Chahuites by getting migrants out of town. His campaign promises earned Ramos a new title: They’ve taken to calling him the Donald Trump of Oaxaca. Ramos won his election in a landslide, garnering more than 50% of the vote. The president of Chahuites has said in interviews that — unlike Trump — he has nothing against undocumented immigrants. Ramos says he wants to kick migrants out of town because voters asked him to and, as a public servant, he has to do what the electorate asks of him. Click here for full article on USA Today Source: USA...