Ibogaine Institute and addiction center in Rosarito, Baja California

Ibogaine Institute and addiction center in Rosarito, Baja California

Jul 19, 2017

When I woke up yesterday morning, I opened the door of my bedroom and walked out to a balcony overlooking the Pacific. I waited to catch a glimpse of the dolphins I had seen the day before and moved on to my meditation ritual. That was the closest I’d get to a mystical experience at the Ibogaine Institute on the coast of Rosarito, Mexico. Upstairs, on the third floor of the house, a man and a woman I had met the day before were laying in a blacked-out room, entering their seventh hour of soul-searching hallucinations. In the house next door, six people had just emerged, changed they said, from a different journey, under the influence of yet another hallucinogen. Kim, who’d been upstairs, is a 29-year-old with the face of a teenager who has been addicted to heroin for seven years. Just like Colin, also undergoing the Ibogaine treatment in the same room, Kim suffered an accident and became dependent on prescription painkillers. When doctors wouldn’t prescribe them anymore, she turned to black market pills. She received a settlement from the accident and said she spent the $90,000 on pills. Finally, she turned to the cheaper alternative, heroin. Just like Colin, Kim said other programs would detox her on Suboxone, a drug used to treat opioid addiction, which also has a high risk for addiction and dependence. She said those programs crowd people into bunk beds and although they teach the twelve steps of Alcoholics Anonymous, she never “even got past the first step.” As other addicts I interviewed told me, you become dependent on the Suboxone and the Methadone and “you can’t really function.” Kim says the Ibogaine Institute “doesn’t seem like any other 30-day program because they actually work on what’s wrong, on the problem of why you use in the first place.” She hopes after her treatment, she can return to Connecticut to be a mother to her 6-year old son, now in custody of Kim’s mom. The institute offers 7 and 30-day programs to chronic relapsers of drug addiction, PTSD patients, and other disorders. Treatments for addiction begin with Ibogaine, a natural African psychoactive drug, and end with Ayahuasca,...

Baja’s Health & Wellness Forum brings together the main players in health and wellness tourism in the region

Baja’s Health & Wellness Forum brings together the main players in health and wellness tourism in the region

Jul 16, 2017

Baja California receives more than 2.4 million patients and their companions a year. On July 27 and 28, the Baja’s Health & Wellness Forum will bring together the main players in health and wellness tourism in the region with potential domestic and international clients: more than 2,000 attendees, more than 80 exhibition stands, 4 workshops, 2 conferences. Achieving 200 business meetings and 1500 business links. Be there and become part of the most important medical forum in Baja California. Position your brand on this great regional platform. Establish business relationships through business meetings. All activities that we have for the forum: workshops, conferences, meetings and business links, exhibitions stands, gastronomic garden and activities in the region. CONTACT PH: 52 (664) 607 3948 ext. 3 Email: info@agenciadeproyectos.com   For more information go to www.bajashealthandwellnessforum.com...

Los Algodones internationally known as “Molar City”

Los Algodones internationally known as “Molar City”

Jul 14, 2017

“Immigration and the Mexican border have been in the news for months. But all the stories have been about people coming to the United States. The untold story is how many Americans are leaving the U.S. for Mexico. Not to stay but to get dental care,” states Wendell Potter, a Huffington Post contributor. So many Americans are making the trip across the border to see a dentist that one small border town, Los Algodones, is now better known by its nickname: Molar City. The demand has become so great that a website has been created to help Americans make appointments with Mexican dentists before they leave home. Los Algodones, population 5,500, is the northernmost town in Mexico, a stone’s throw from the international border at Andrade, California, and just 10 miles west of Yuma, Arizona. But this is no typical border town. It has far more dentists per capita than any city or town in Mexico. Or the United States for that matter. In fact, it reportedly has the highest density of dentists in the world. By some estimates, just about one of every 15 residents is a dentist. “This is a city that was built on caring for teeth. It’s flourished because its wealthy neighbour puts a high price on the cost of a healthy smile.”, Sky News reporters, who visited “Molar City” recently, expressed. According to the people whom they interviewed at the site, Americans and Canadians can save up to thousands of dollars for the same procedures and quality they would find in the United States or Canada, as a lot of the dentists who work in Los Algodones have received professional training in the USA. Below is a simple comparison done by Sky News to show how much people save in this haven for dental tourism. Price Comparison (USD) Crown and implant: Mexico: $190; US: $600 Implants: Mexico: $1,100; US: $4,000 SOURCES: Sky News / Sky News Youtube Channel / SDP Noticias / Huffington...

COFEPRIS approves prostate cancer treatment developed in Israel

COFEPRIS approves prostate cancer treatment developed in Israel

Jul 12, 2017

Mexico’s COFEPRIS health authority has authorized the use of an early-stage prostate cancer drug and laser therapy developed by the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, (about 20 kilometers (12 miles) south of Tel Aviv) in collaboration with Luxembourg’s Steba Biotech. COFEPRIS stands for Comisión Federal para la Protección contra Riesgos Sanitarios(Federal Commission for Protection against Sanitary Risks) and is the authority with competence to control and regulate drug products in Mexico. A successful Phase III clinical trial in Mexico, Peru and Panama of the treatment called TOOKAD Solublem, involved 80 patients. The results confirmed a high rate of local cures and minimal side effects already reported in Phase II trials. Negative biopsies and maintenance of patients’ potency, continence and overall quality of life were evidence of the high success rate. There are not many other successful drugs against early-stage prostate cancer. The approved therapy follows a new paradigm developed by Weizmann Prof. Yoram Salomon of the biological regulation department and Prof. Avigdor Scherz of the plant and environmental sciences department, in the framework of photodynamic therapy. The Israeli-invented drug was first synthesized in Scherz’s lab from bacteriochlorophyll, the photosynthetic pigment of certain aquatic bacteria that draw their energy supply from sunlight. The marketing approval in Mexico follows the recent completion of a second Phase III clinical trial in Europe. This randomized pivot study compared disease progression, the cancer-free rate and urinary and erectile functions in patients including those undergoing active surveillance, with a follow-up of two years. It involved more than 400 patients at 43 hospitals in 11 European countries and is under evaluation by the European Medicines Agency (EMA). The therapy involves an intravenous infusion of TOOKAD Soluble, immediately followed by near-infrared laser illumination through thin optic fibers inserted into the cancerous tissue, while doctors control the process by ultrasound. The non-toxic drug remains in the patient’s blood for three or four hours. Confined illumination of the diseased tissue activates the drug, resulting in the extensive generation of short-lived toxic molecules. The highly reactive oxygen and nitric oxide radicals initiate speedy occlusion and destruction of the tumor’s blood vessels, followed by necrotic death of the entire tumor while nearby healthy structures and their functions...

Medical Tourism extends to Pet Care

Medical Tourism extends to Pet Care

Jul 8, 2017

Fernando Garcia drove 30 minutes from his home in Yuma, Arizona to Centro Medico Veterinario-or Veterinary Medical Center, across the U.S.-Mexico border in San Luis Rio Colorado. Garcia and his family listen as a staff veterinarian explains some lab results and recommends surgery for new patient, Nube, the family’s 11-year old Chihuahua. “What they are telling us right now at the moment is that she does have a little mole that needs to get removed, so they would laser that off,” Garcia said. “Then they would take her reproductive organs which in turn reduce the masses around her mammary glands that have been coming up.” Garcia said in the U.S. the price for the surgery alone is about $1,200. “Here we are paying about $250,” Garcia said. Surprisingly, it was Garcia’s U.S. veterinarian who referred him to the clinic across the border. “It’s not easy to come up with $1,200 when you have other bills but obviously you want to be there for your pet just like they are there for you,” he said. Centro Medico Veterinario is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Doctor Sergio Miguel Garcia Moreno, who began his career at the clinic 14 years ago, said they’ve seen a growing number of Americans coming through their doors. “We’ve been seeing a lot, even more because we have an MRI machine,” Moreno said. “We’ve been seeing a lot of patients from Phoenix, San Diego, Los Angeles, Yuma, San Luis, and Somerton.” That might be because the cost for an MRI can run up to $2,500 per diagnostic screening in the U.S. It’s a stark price difference at Moreno’s office. “For an MRI scan they start from $400 and they can go up to $600 to $800 depending on the zone that we are going to MRI,” he said. “And if the patient is a small, medium or large dog.” Veterinary care in the U.S. is subject to many of the same market forces as human health care – the high costs of labor, drugs, and facilities drive up overhead. Many vet practice’s use the same labs and suppliers used by human health care providers, with pricing models and regulations...

US company begins Cannabidiol sales in Mexico

US company begins Cannabidiol sales in Mexico

Jul 7, 2017

Raul Elizalde, a lawyer who along with his wife Mayela Benavides won the first authorization for the medical use of Cannabis, was appointed president of HempMeds Mexico, a subsidiary company of Medical Marijuana Inc., dedicated to the manufacture of marijuana pharmaceuticals, reported “El Universal”. Elizalde will be at the head of a company that seeks to introduce medical cannabis in the national market, estimated to reach in a few years from USD$2 thousand to USD$5 billion. The company is focused on bringing the benefits of medical use of the plant to patients of neurodegenerative diseases, diabetic neuropathy, pain, and diabetes, among others, and even for cosmetic purposes. Pioneer During its first stage, HempMeds will focus on marketing the more than 100 products that Medical Marijuana produces in San Diego, California, as well as research and development of new medicines in Mexico. Stuart Titus, President of Medical Marijuana Inc, said their plans to open a subsidiary in Mexico started in 2016 when they began to deal with Raul Elizalde, and now it is a reality after the authorization of the medicinal use of Cannabis, approved by the Lower Chamber on April 28 2017. The American company was founded in 2009, becoming the first company of its kind listed on the stock exchange and that standardizes concentrations of active ingredients in Cannabis products. Elizalde said that “it is a privilege to be the person who will lead one of the largest companies in the world in the medical Cannabis market, as this oil has changed the lives of my family, my daughter Grace and hundreds of patients.” From February 2016 to the same month of 2017, the company obtained 256 approvals so that Mexican patients could purchase the oil. In addition, it has supported the scientific investigations of recognized neuro pediatricians in the country, where more than 80% of patients have shown improvement in the frequency of epileptic seizures after the use of Cannabis derivatives....