Ibogaine Institute and addiction center in Rosarito, Baja California

Ibogaine Institute and addiction center in Rosarito, Baja California

Jul 19, 2017

When I woke up yesterday morning, I opened the door of my bedroom and walked out to a balcony overlooking the Pacific. I waited to catch a glimpse of the dolphins I had seen the day before and moved on to my meditation ritual. That was the closest I’d get to a mystical experience at the Ibogaine Institute on the coast of Rosarito, Mexico. Upstairs, on the third floor of the house, a man and a woman I had met the day before were laying in a blacked-out room, entering their seventh hour of soul-searching hallucinations. In the house next door, six people had just emerged, changed they said, from a different journey, under the influence of yet another hallucinogen. Kim, who’d been upstairs, is a 29-year-old with the face of a teenager who has been addicted to heroin for seven years. Just like Colin, also undergoing the Ibogaine treatment in the same room, Kim suffered an accident and became dependent on prescription painkillers. When doctors wouldn’t prescribe them anymore, she turned to black market pills. She received a settlement from the accident and said she spent the $90,000 on pills. Finally, she turned to the cheaper alternative, heroin. Just like Colin, Kim said other programs would detox her on Suboxone, a drug used to treat opioid addiction, which also has a high risk for addiction and dependence. She said those programs crowd people into bunk beds and although they teach the twelve steps of Alcoholics Anonymous, she never “even got past the first step.” As other addicts I interviewed told me, you become dependent on the Suboxone and the Methadone and “you can’t really function.” Kim says the Ibogaine Institute “doesn’t seem like any other 30-day program because they actually work on what’s wrong, on the problem of why you use in the first place.” She hopes after her treatment, she can return to Connecticut to be a mother to her 6-year old son, now in custody of Kim’s mom. The institute offers 7 and 30-day programs to chronic relapsers of drug addiction, PTSD patients, and other disorders. Treatments for addiction begin with Ibogaine, a natural African psychoactive drug, and end with Ayahuasca,...

Medical Tourism extends to Pet Care

Medical Tourism extends to Pet Care

Jul 8, 2017

Fernando Garcia drove 30 minutes from his home in Yuma, Arizona to Centro Medico Veterinario-or Veterinary Medical Center, across the U.S.-Mexico border in San Luis Rio Colorado. Garcia and his family listen as a staff veterinarian explains some lab results and recommends surgery for new patient, Nube, the family’s 11-year old Chihuahua. “What they are telling us right now at the moment is that she does have a little mole that needs to get removed, so they would laser that off,” Garcia said. “Then they would take her reproductive organs which in turn reduce the masses around her mammary glands that have been coming up.” Garcia said in the U.S. the price for the surgery alone is about $1,200. “Here we are paying about $250,” Garcia said. Surprisingly, it was Garcia’s U.S. veterinarian who referred him to the clinic across the border. “It’s not easy to come up with $1,200 when you have other bills but obviously you want to be there for your pet just like they are there for you,” he said. Centro Medico Veterinario is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Doctor Sergio Miguel Garcia Moreno, who began his career at the clinic 14 years ago, said they’ve seen a growing number of Americans coming through their doors. “We’ve been seeing a lot, even more because we have an MRI machine,” Moreno said. “We’ve been seeing a lot of patients from Phoenix, San Diego, Los Angeles, Yuma, San Luis, and Somerton.” That might be because the cost for an MRI can run up to $2,500 per diagnostic screening in the U.S. It’s a stark price difference at Moreno’s office. “For an MRI scan they start from $400 and they can go up to $600 to $800 depending on the zone that we are going to MRI,” he said. “And if the patient is a small, medium or large dog.” Veterinary care in the U.S. is subject to many of the same market forces as human health care – the high costs of labor, drugs, and facilities drive up overhead. Many vet practice’s use the same labs and suppliers used by human health care providers, with pricing models and regulations...

Don´t miss the Craft Beer Conference today in San Felipe BC

Don´t miss the Craft Beer Conference today in San Felipe BC

Jul 5, 2017

Craft Beer Conference in San Felipe today. Congressmen Jorge Eugenio Núñez reported that today, at 5 p.m. a conference on Craft Beer will take place at the Pete’s Camp / Playa Paraíso facility in San Felipe BC, as part of an event organized by the Committee of Tourism and Conventions (Cotuco). He underlined that it will be an honor to be able to talk about this Baja California product, because its growth is reflecting at national level, as local craft beer brands have obtained outstanding prizes, and in addition, this product is consolidating in the taste of the regional market. The legislator mentioned that artisan beer and all the context around it are generating a culture of their own, not only because of its great flavor, but also because this relatively new industry is raising awareness about the importance of local consumption and the generation of an identity of its own. The event, which will also be attended by Hector Corella of Amante Brew Company, will be open to the public and will take place at the Petes Camp / Playa Paraíso facility in the port of San Felipe starting at 5:00 p.m....

Mexican government promotes World Sexual Diversity Day

Mexican government promotes World Sexual Diversity Day

Jun 29, 2017

Wednesday June 28, was recognized worldwide as World Sexual Diversity day. The Mexican government has been investing in changes that are in favor of the acceptance and respect of sexual diversity around the country. Not only that, but México also has several states and communities which are LGBTQ+ friendly, including Cancún and La Riviera Maya. According to El Diario de Yucatán newspaper, the National Institute of Social Development (Indesol), with an investment of more than $1.5 million pesos from the government, benefited 91,734 people. Such assistance was made through social projects which strengthened the respect of human rights and non-discrimination of the LGBTQ+ population. The federal government stated that the resources of the Social Coinvestment Program were destined to organizations in Mexico City, Hidalgo, Guanajuato, Michoacán, Puebla, San Luis Potosi, Sonora, Queretaro, Tlaxcala and Zacatecas. Photo: Google In 2016, the government released a statement where they co-inverted among seven civil society initiatives to improve the living conditions of the LGBTQ+ community. For instance, through actions such as the eradication of violence and non-discrimination against transphobia; bolstering access to services and supplies for sexual and reproductive health for LGBTQ+ people. Furthermore, in regards of LGBTQ+ friendly places around the country, Cancún and La Riviera Maya are among them. These two places count with a certification from the International Gay and Lesbian Travel Association. Playa Delfines, Las Perlas, and El Parque de las Palapas are well-known places where the gay community can freely walk around. There are other resorts and hotels which are gay-friendly, such as Oasis Sens, Viceroy Riviera Maya, Playa Palms Beach Hotel, and the Secrets The Vine, among others; as well as bars and clubs like Karamba Bar; Picante Bar, and Sentimientos Bar. SOURCE: El Diario de Yucatán / La Verdad...

American residents feel the “Trump Effect” in Rosarito Baja California

American residents feel the “Trump Effect” in Rosarito Baja California

Jun 18, 2017

California writer,  former president of the National Society of Newspaper Columnists and Fulbright scholar Peter Rowe, published an editorial piece on the San Diego Union Tribune describing how many Baja Expats feel about Trump and sharing aspects of an interview he conducted with Rudolfo Figueroa, director o f the Mexican immigration office for Baja California.  In the Baja California city of Rosarito Beach, President Donald Trump has plenty of critics. American critics. Ken Bell, a Californian who has lived here since 1999, recoiled when candidate Trump promised to build a border wall while trashing Mexican immigrants. (“They’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists. And some, I assume, are good people.”) “If I’m going to build a fence with my neighbor,” said Bell, a former Vietnam War veteran, “the first thing I do is not insult them.” Terri Raposa, who has lived here for 12 years said: “Trump is like a joke. I don’t know of one person who voted for him, and if they did they won’t admit it.” But the fact is, there are more than a few Trump fans among the area’s estimated 15,000 to 30,000 U.S. citizens. John Murphy, a former Anaheim resident who has lived here for 28 years, cheered Trump’s victory. Even so, the loyal Republican and Baja California enthusiast offered some friendly advice to the new U.S. president. “Tone down the rhetoric.” Murphy said. Just like their fellow Americans north of the border, Rosarito Beach’s expatriates are coming to terms with the Trump administration. Living just 35 miles south of San Diego, these U.S. citizens’ perspectives are seasoned by their residency in a foreign land. As events unfold in Washington, they wrestle with concerns that have as much to do with their temporary home as their native country. Will tightened security add to the delays at the border crossings? Will tariffs on goods exported into the U.S. damage Rosarito Beach’s economy? Will more deportations lead to increased crime in Mexico’s border cities? Living abroad has always meant adventures and adjustments. For Rosarito Beach’s expats, the Trump era means a new set of uncertainties. “If Trump has complete control over the border, who knows what will happen,” said Bob...

Did you know that stress affects your cholesterol level?

Did you know that stress affects your cholesterol level?

Jun 12, 2017

This week, Positive Health Wellness shares in The Baja Post an editorial by specialist Karen Reed that describes exactly how stress affects your levels of cholesterol. You’ve heard all about how high cholesterol levels are causing ill health. More importantly, you’ve heard about how bad cholesterol is causing ill health. It affects your arteries and blood flow, putting your heart under more pressure to perform properly. Those with high cholesterol levels are more at risk of stroke, heart attacks, and heart disease. Cholesterol has long been linked to the food we eat. There are certain foods that we’re recommended to stay away from and others that we should get more off to promote good cholesterol levels and help protect the arteries. Did you know that it’s not just food that affects the cholesterol levels? Stress has been linked to high cholesterol. In fact, some studies now show that stress is worse than the food we eat for cholesterol levels and ill health. The problem is that stress is a silent killer. We don’t realize that our cortisol levels are up and causing these problems until it’s too late in some cases. It’s important to reduce our stress levels to keep our cholesterol levels down. Here’s a look at just how stress causes high cholesterol and what you can do about it. What Exactly Is Cholesterol? Before you start looking at stress and how it affects to high cholesterol levels, you need to know more about it. What exactly is it and what does it do? There are two types of cholesterol: good and bad. The bad cholesterol is known as LDL cholesterol, and you shouldn’t have any more than 100mg/dL of this type in your body. Good cholesterol is HDL, and you should have at least 60mg/dL. A good level of total cholesterol, according to physicians, is 200mg/dL and this can be made up of both good and bad. Considering you shouldn’t have more that 100mg/dL of the bad stuff, you want at least 100mg/dL of the good stuff. The more good cholesterol you have, the better it is for you. Good cholesterol can keep the bad stuff at bay and under control. Click...