ICBC will award 400 scholarships to children and teens who excel in music, theater, dance, plastic arts and literature

ICBC will award 400 scholarships to children and teens who excel in music, theater, dance, plastic arts and literature

Jan 17, 2018

Children and teenagers between 6 and 18 years of age, who have skills in artistic disciplines, may apply for a scholarship from the Artistic Talents program of the Institute of Culture of Baja California (ICBC) until Wednesday, February 28, 2018 at 5:00 p.m., which is the deadline to submit applications. The Government of the State of Baja California, through the Institute of Culture of Baja California, and in coordination with the Ministry of Culture of the Federal Government, offers scholarships in the following artistic disciplines: music, theater, dance, plastic arts and literature. “The categories are girls and boys between 6 and 14 years of age (by February 28, 2018). And teens between 15 and 18 years of age (by February 28, 2018”), informed the General Director of the ICBC, Manuel Felipe Bejarano Giacomán. The requirements are: to excel and / or have skills in any of the artistic disciplines. The evaluation of the applications submitted will be the responsibility of the Collegiate Council of the Academic Program and the State Talent Festival; children and young people in art, governing body for planning and monitoring the program, which is made up of prominent and renowned creators of the state of Baja California in each of the aforementioned artistic disciplines. The deadline for submitting an application by the candidates for the 2018 selection is Wednesday, February 28, 2018 at 5:00 p.m. For more information (in Spanish) go to: http://www.icbc.gob.mx/   –oo0oo– ENSENADA Representación del ICBC Centro Social, Cívico y Cultural Riviera Bulevar Costero s/n Ensenada, Baja California, C.P. 22800 Tel.: (646) 177 3130   Centro Estatal de las Artes (CEART Ensenada) Bulevar Lázaro Cárdenas y Calle Riviera Zona Centro, Ensenada Baja California Tel. y Fax: (646) 173 4307 y 08   MEXICALI Oficinas generales Avenida Álvaro Obregón No. 1209, Col. Nueva Mexicali, Baja California, C.P. 21100 Tel.:(686) 553 50 44 exts. 122 y 123 Fax.: (686) 554 12 78   Centro Estatal de las Artes (CEART Mexicali) Calzada de los Presidentes y Ciudad Victoria s/n Zona Río Nuevo, Mexicali, B.C. Tel.: (686) 553 6955 y (686) 553 6952   PLAYAS DE ROSARITO Representación del ICBC Paseo de La Cascada s/n, Fracc. La Cascada. Tel. y Fax: (661) 612 6760, 116 5243   Centro Estatal de...

Mexican artist is painting the ‘world’s longest mural’ on the US-Mexico border wall

Mexican artist is painting the ‘world’s longest mural’ on the US-Mexico border wall

Jan 13, 2018

As the Trump administration seeks $18 billion over the next decade to more than double the length of the US-Mexico border fencing, one artist has another plan for the barriers. Mexican artist Enrique Chiu is working to cover the existing border wall in colorful murals. His ultimate goal is to paint connected works there that span over 600 miles — which would become the world’s longest mural. Chiu sees the project, called the “Mural of Brotherhood,” as “a way to unite the two nations that are divided.” The works, which often include images found in Mexican folklore, can take a full day or several weeks (depending on the size) to complete. His ultimate goal is to paint connected works there that span over 600 miles – which would become the world’s longest mural. Enrique Chiu, who has worked as an artist for 18 years, has painted over 80 murals in 10 cities across California, Mexico, and Guatemala. He sees this project, which he calls the “Mural of Brotherhood,” as “a way to unite the two nations that are divided.” To paint on the Mexico side, Chiu gained permission from his country’s border security department. He hopes to eventually make it a binational project, and paint on the U.S. side too. “There has always been a border united by the border cities. If the interest was to maintain peace in the world, [the Trump administration] would promote education and equality in the US, not violence and racism,” Chiu said. Chiu considers himself an advocate for migrant and immigration rights. The murals are meant to “leave a positive message to support Latino people,” he said. “They’re also intended as a form of protest against the border wall that the Trump administration wishes to build,” he concluded. This year, Chiu will also install a 50-foot-tall sculpture that represents peace at the US-Mexico border. Source: Business...

Mexican Guillermo del Toro wins the 2018 Golden Globe for Best Director

Mexican Guillermo del Toro wins the 2018 Golden Globe for Best Director

Jan 9, 2018

Guillermo del Toro has won the 2018 Golden Globe for Best Director for his dark fantasy film The Shape of Water, a Cold War-era monster movie and remixed fairy tale musical, starring Sally Hawkins and Michael Shannon. Following Oprah Winfrey’s speech about the plight of women in Hollywood, Natalie Portman announced the category, pointedly saying “Here are the all-male nominees.” Only three women have been nominated for the award in the last 20 years, and this year, there were several especially notable absences: Greta Gerwig, whose debut feature Lady Bird was nominated for Best Musical or Comedy; Sofia Coppola, who recently became the second woman to ever win Best Director at the Cannes Film Festival; and Patty Jenkins, who made one of the most critically acclaimed superhero movies of all time this year. Del Toro accepted the award with a speech about the value of monster movies, saying “I have been saved and absolved by them. Monsters are our way of making sense of imperfection.” When the orchestra tried to play him offstage, he hushed the conductor and continued, saying, “For 25 years, I have handcrafted very strange little tales made of motion, color, light, and shadow. And in many of these instances — three precise instances — these little stories have saved my life.” Shape of Water was nominated for seven Golden Globes, including one for the screenplay co-written by del Toro and Vanessa Taylor....

Haitian Carnival coming to Mexicali on February

Haitian Carnival coming to Mexicali on February

Jan 8, 2018

Just over a year and a half ago, thousands of migrants from Haiti came to the Baja California with a single purpose: to seek political or humanitarian asylum in the United States. As the political landscape in our northern neighbor changed, so did the goals of some migrants they saw in Baja California and particularly in Mexicali, a place that gave them the hope of forging a better life with their effort. The Civil Haitian Movement Association of Mexico with headquarters in the state capital has more than 500 active members, and for this 2018 they want to offer and present their culture to the “cachanilla” people. Therefore, the first annual Haitian Carnival for will be carried out next February 14 in Mexicali, BC. The Haitian community has also a scheduled march through the streets of Mexicali, May 18, which is one of their national celebrations known as the day of the flag of Haiti. José Joseph commented that most of the necessary resources will come from the pockets of the Haitians living in Mexicali, but he added that all contributions are welcome. Source: Civil Haitian Movement Association of...

Facts to know about “Día de Reyes”

Facts to know about “Día de Reyes”

Jan 6, 2018

“Día de los Reyes” is a significant holiday celebration across Latin America. Known formally as the Feast of the Epiphany, “Día de los Reyes” commemorates the visit of the three kings or the Magi to Baby Jesus, thereby representing Christ’s physical revelation to the gentiles. The celebration is particularly important in Latin America and in some cases takes on greater importance than Christmas. Here are Six Facts About Three King’s Day in Latin America. “Día de los Reyes” (Google) 1. Bigger Than Santa: In much of Latin America Día de los Reyes or Día de los Reyes Magos is celebrated in particular by children who receive gifts from the three Magi. Often, this tradition is more significant than Santa Claus: children usually write a letter to the Kings, naming the gifts they would like. On the night of January 5th, children leave one of their shoes outside the door along with grass and water for the camels. The next day, children wake up to numerous gifts left by the three kings or the “reyes magos”. On the night of January 5th, children leave one of their shoes outside the door along with grass and water for the camels. (Google) 2. Edible Wreaths: In Spain and Mexico, one of the most important elements of “Día de los Reyes” is the “Rosca de Reyes”, or the Wreath of the Kings. A large, oval-shaped cake filled with sweetened dried fruit, the Kings Cake symbolizes a crown. A small white figurine representing Baby Jesus is hidden inside the cake, commemorating the hiding of Jesus from Herod. Whoever gets the slice with the figurine has to host a party on February 2nd or “Día de la Candelaria” (specifically in Mexico, the family gets together on “Día de la Candelaria” for a tamale dinner, the person who found the baby Jesus figurine in the rosca has to buy the tamales). Rosca de Reyes (Google) 3. Lima Discovered: Peru’s capital Lima was originally called Ciudad de los Reyes: legend has it that explorer Francisco Pizarro named it so because he discovered the ideal site for the city on January 6th. Día de Reyes in Lima Perú (Google) 4. Parades And Parties: Across Latin America and the United States, Latinos celebrate...

The United States will fund restoration of Palenque archaeological site

The United States will fund restoration of Palenque archaeological site

Dec 19, 2017

The United States will fund restoration work at a Mayan archaeological site in Palenque, Chiapas, to the tune of US $500,000. The National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) and the U.S. embassy announced the conservation and restoration program on December 4. Ambassador Roberta Jacobson said the money would be delivered over the course of the next three years through the U.S. Ambassador’s Fund for Cultural Preservation. The funding will focus on two important areas located at the Palenque site: the tomb of Pakal and part of an architectural complex known as El Palacio (The Palace). INAH director general Diego Prieto Hernández said the project will repair deterioration in the sarcophagus of Pakal and structures of the El Palacio. INAH researchers will carry out the work, addressing humidity, water filtration and temperature change, which have caused severe damage to the walls of the crypt. As well as repairing structural elements, the project will restore nine plaster figures surrounding the crypt, which represent the Lords of the Night, guardians of the ruler. Pakal governed from 615 to 683 BC. Ambassador Jacobson said she felt a close relationship with the Mayan city, which captivated her interest when she was younger. It also formed part of her doctoral thesis, which focused on the looting of Mayan tombs. She added that the Ambassador’s Fund was proud to donate the money to INAH, a move she asserted will demonstrate that the relation between both nations is now stronger than ever in many areas, such as education and culture. Several factors have negatively affected the archaeological site since its discovery in 1952, including shifting weather patterns, the natural deterioration of the construction materials and the deforestation of the surrounding area. Palenque was named an archaeological monument zone by the federal government in 1981, and recognized as a world heritage site by UNESCO in 1987. Pakal’s tomb has been closed to the public for more than 10 years to avoid further deterioration....