“Treasures of a Lost Galleon” arrive to Mexicali’s Museo del Sol

“Treasures of a Lost Galleon” arrive to Mexicali’s Museo del Sol

Sep 18, 2017

More than 1,500 archaeological artefacts, mostly of Asian origin that never reached port, have been recovered by INAH researchers from a sunken boat stranded on the Baja California coast, which are now being exhibited at the Museo del Sol in Mexicali. Julia Bendímez Patterson, a delegate from the INAH Center in Baja California, mentioned that the exhibition “Treasures of a Lost Galleon” (Tesoros de un Galeón Perdido) was first opened in February 2011 at the Ex Aduana Marítima de Ensenada and five years later at the Museo Caracol. She emphasized that the investigators of Underwater Archeology of the institute, have worked since 1999 in this shipwreck that is dated between 1574 and 1576, according to the analysis of several fragments of porcelain retrieved from the boat. Because it is a shipwreck, the delegate emphasized that only fragments of different objects have been obtained. The ship was bringing these objects from the Far East, with the port of Acapulco as final destination. “The remains include numerous fragments of porcelain from the Ming dynasty, vessels for food storage, fine species containers, and some metal pieces,” she added. Bendímez Patterson detailed that fragments of fine porcelain, wax blocks, figurines of Chinese dogs in bronze speak of the extensive connection in the Pacific between Chinese, Japanese and other nations that converged in Manila, Phillipines with different types of cargo. Finally, she indicated that the content of the exhibition showcases the importance of the economic activity generated by the transpacific trade between the Far East and New Spain for more than 250 years, which began at the end of the 16th century and ended in 1815....

Tijuana animal-rights lawyers win one for donkeys painted like zebras

Tijuana animal-rights lawyers win one for donkeys painted like zebras

Sep 16, 2017

Only real estate — not living beings — can be considered part of Tijuana’s cultural heritage, a federal judge has ruled, revoking an earlier decision by the Cultural Heritage Council of Baja California declaring zonkeys to be part of the city’s cultural patrimony. Zonkeys — donkeys painted to look like zebras — have become a widely recognized symbol of downtown Tijuana. They were declared part of the city’s cultural heritage three years ago. The ruling came from a judge of the second federal district court, according to a September 13 story in El Sol de Tijuana. The story did not identify the judge. The decision was issued after a group of animal-rights attorneys sought an injunction prohibiting the designation on the grounds that the law recognizes only real estate as eligible for the designation — not living beings or a species of animal, El Sol reported. Luis Hernández, the attorney who brought the case, told the newspaper that the zonkeys can still be used along Avenida Revolución but may not receive any resources from the state as a consequence of a cultural heritage designation. Hernández said animal-rights activists are not opposed to using zonkeys as a symbol of the city, but prefer that living animals not be used. Instead, he suggested, a representation of a zonkey could be used instead and placed in commercial plazas or used at cultural events. Animal-rights activists made the same suggestion several years ago, arguing that the zonkeys should be replaced by fiberglass replicas because using live donkeys is a form of animal abuse....

Director of the Music National Conservatory performs Mexican composers’ pieces in Mexicali

Director of the Music National Conservatory performs Mexican composers’ pieces in Mexicali

Sep 13, 2017

Mexicali BC, September 11, 2017.- With a complete sold out, Maestro David Rodríguez de la Peña played “Four works for piano” giving an outstanding performance where the audience could enjoy a recital full of emotion and musical integrity . About 300 Mexicalenses witnessed the professionalism of Rodríguez de la Peña in front of a piano in a program that lasted more than an hour. A night of tributes to Mexican composers was lived in the Salvadora Caldera Theater of the House of Culture of Mexicali, where the audience listened to melodies of Aniceto Ortega, Manuel M. Ponce, Jose Rolon, and David Rodriguez himself. The concert featured works such as “Romanza sin palabras”, “Elegía”, “Un pensamiento”, “Amor e inocencia“, “Three indigenous dances from Jalisco”, “Lola Flores” and “Luis Barragan” a homage to the famous Mexican architect that featured contemporary dancer Inés Herrera Campa. David Rodríguez is the current director of the National Music Conservatory, has participated in numerous occasions as a soloist with the Cincinnati Philharmonic Orchestra, Baja California Orchestra, Coahuila Symphony Orchestra, and Orchestra of the Center for Music Studies of the Autonomous University of Baja California, among others. He is also a collaborator with the municipality of Toluca, State of Mexico, for the conformation of the recently founded Toluca Symphony Orchestra. The concert “Four works for piano” was possible thanks to a combined effort by the National Institute of Fine Arts (INBA) and the 22nd Municipality of Mexicali through the Municipal Institute of Art and Culture (IMACUM). For more information about other cultural events and activities carried out by IMACUM, call  554 8333, Communication area, Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., or check out the Imacum Arte Cultura Facebook...

“Casa de las Ranas” psychedelic sanctuary in San Miguel de Allende

“Casa de las Ranas” psychedelic sanctuary in San Miguel de Allende

Sep 6, 2017

The National Geographic Society has been inspiring people since 1888, its interests include geography, archaeology and natural science, as well as the promotion of environmental and historical conservation. Award-winning freelance photographer Bob Krist shot his first assignment for National Geographic in 1980. And today, February 24th, 2016, thirty six years later, Bob delivers this one of a kind story about a magical place near San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato, called “The Chapel of Jimmy Ray”: A charming Spanish colonial city with a UNESCO World Heritage designation, San Miguel de Allende, located in the central highlands of Mexico, is a mecca for all manner of creative types. In a place where scores of art galleries cluster in and around a vibrant centro histórico, you’d hardly think it necessary to make a trek three miles out of town to see one more. But if you don’t, you’ll miss what is arguably the most interesting attraction the area has to offer—not to mention one of its most colorful characters. Assemblage artist Anado McLauchlin lives on a fantastic 2.5-acre compound called Casa de las Ranas (House of the Frogs). The clear focal point of the property is the Chapel of Jimmy Ray, a gallery that showcases Anado’s work, which he describes as “an irreverent gumbo of the creative, joyful, sacred, profane, dangerous, and adorned.” The American expat (Anado’s given name is James Rayburn McLauchlin, III) was raised in Oklahoma and spent significant periods of time in New York City, India, San Francisco, and the Sacred Valley of Peru before relocating with his husband, Richard Schultz, to La Cieneguita, a small village on the outskirts of San Miguel de Allende in 2001. McLauchlin describes Casa de las Ranas as “a life project” he and his husband are creating together that’s meant to be an “homage to the outlander viewpoint, visionary and purely original.” The gallery, house, and gardens all reflect Anado’s eclectic vision, which combines indigenous secular and religious influences with a sort of freewheeling psychedelia. The genial artist, whose work sells around the world, shares his vision with people who make the pilgrimage to see him… provided they have an appointment. But for those who can’t make the trip, this video by National Geographic Traveler contributing photographer Bob Krist offers a peek inside the Chapel of Jimmy Ray...

New Frida Kahlo – Diego Rivera opera in the works

New Frida Kahlo – Diego Rivera opera in the works

Aug 31, 2017

Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo will be the protagonists of an upcoming opera which has been tentatively called “The Last Dream of Frida and Diego”, expected to premiere in 2020, reports eluniversal.com.mx. The production will be a co-commission between the Fort Worth Opera company, the San Diego Opera, the College of Fine Arts at the University of Texas at Austin and DePauw University; with music composed by Latin Grammy winner Gabriela Lena Frank, and written by Pulitzer Prize winner Nilo Cruz. The creative team traveled to Mexico to visit key locations in Mexico City, such as the Templo Mayor, and to talk a bit about the progress of their work, which proposes a final dialogue between Frida and Diego. During a press conference at the Manuel M. Ponce Room of the Palace of Fine Arts in Mexico, the composer explained that the world premiere will be in Texas, but they hope that, in time, a Mexican company becomes interested in the opera. For his part, Nilo Cruz claimed the cast and the rest of the crew haven’t been decided yet, but they want to cast, at least, artists with Mexican – or Latin American – descent. “My music is very dramatic and the opera proposes a very intimate encounter between Diego and Frida. To me, music is like Mozart with lyrics. We have a lot of work ahead of us. I want to create an opera that cannot be easily labeled,” said Frank. It still unknown whether the production will have an orchestra or an ensemble. The opera is set in Mexico City in 1957, during the celebration of the Dia de Muertos (Day of the Dead). Diego Rivera is walking on a cemetery, yearning to reunite with his deceased Frida. The Catrina lets the painter know the muralist is looking for her, and, reluctantly, Frida agrees to meet Diego and lead him towards the world of the dead. “In 24 hours, Frida and Diego will relive their tumultuous relationship through their paintings, reminding the love, passion and even the pain that once joined them,” according to the press release. When discussing the vision of Mexico and the stereotypes related to the artists, the Day of the Dead, the Mictlán – the underworld in Aztec mythology – and characters such as La Malinche,...

Malala will visit Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education

Malala will visit Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education

Aug 20, 2017

Through the institution’s facebook account, Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education (ITESM) confirmed that Malala Yousafzai, a Pakistani activist, will visit its Santa Fe campus, according to El Universal. According to information provided by the institution, Malala will be in Mexico City on Thursday, August 31. Malala is known for human rights advocacy, especially involving women. In 2012, a gunman attempted to murder her. She remained unconscious and in critical condition and consequently she was sent to the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, UK, after the shooting. In 2014, when she was 17, Malala became the youngest Nobel Peace Prize winner. Currently, Malala is 20 years old and she is the author of two books: I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban and Malala’s Magic Pencil. “We are ready to welcome a world leader with a sense of humanity”, celebrated the ITESM....