Pedro Infante lives in the heart of all Mexicans!

Pedro Infante lives in the heart of all Mexicans!

Nov 18, 2017

Infante was born November 18, in the Mexican fishing town of Mazatlan. Apprenticed as a carpenter, he learnt music from his father, mastering the guitar, piano, violin and drums. He became renowned for his voice while touring with his father’s band, La Rabia. Pedro Infante in the 1951 film Full Speed Ahead (A toda máquina) Photo: WIKICOMMONS “Mixing feeling with technique, his soulful croon forever changed the way the mariachi was sung and he helped popularize the genre around the world,” said Google. Screen legend  Infante was one of the best-known figures in the Golden Age of Mexican Cinema, making 60 movies and recording more than 360 songs in a 14 year period. His first leading role was in the film La Feria de Las Flores in 1943, with other notable films including Ahi Viene Martin Corona and Los Hijos de Maria Morales and La Vida No Vale Nada. Infante’s iconic role in 1953’s Pepe El Toro saw him explore his  passion for boxing on screen, while in A Toda Máquina he played the role of a motorcycle cop—in a role noted for its high speed stunt sequences. Despite his fame and success, the Latin American Herald Tribune reports that Infante was renown for his modesty and willingness to help people in difficulty with financial assistance or work. The newspaper reports that he once refused service in a restaurant until he had helped the beleaguered owner finish the washing up. Infante died in 1957 in a plane crash. He was posthumously awarded a Silver Bear for Best Actor at the 7th Berlin International Film Festival for his performance in Tizoc, his last film. Today would have been his 100th birthday. Happy birthday Pedrito !!!...

Tribute to The Beatles and John Lennon at CEART Mexicali

Tribute to The Beatles and John Lennon at CEART Mexicali

Nov 8, 2017

For all fans of the Liverpool quartet, this Friday, November 10, the Institute of Culture of Baja California (ICBC) will present a tribute to The Beatles and John Lennon with the Beatlepool & John Leo group at the Plaza de las Artes of CEART in Mexicali. Beatlepool is a Mexican group formed in 2010, which is dedicated to making a tribute to The Beatles. It is conformed by Iván Rodríguez, Benjamín Ramos, Luis Díaz, Jorge Yepiz and Jordy Diaz. The aim of this group is to present a show based on the work of The Beatles, from the “Beatlemania (1964)” to the end of the group (1969). We have done very well with John Leo (Leonel Ibarra) John Lennon’s impersonator, who due to his great resemblance to Lennon, has starred in several television commercials, and participated in TV Azteca’s program “Soy tu doble” where he obtained third place at National level, says Iván Rodríguez. In addition, he says that with this show they have had the opportunity to participate in different stages around town, as well as in Tijuana and San Diego at the House of Blues. The concert will take place at the Plaza de las Artes of CEART on Friday, November 10, starting at 7:00 p.m., admission $ 100 pesos. Tickets are on sale at the CEART reception. Reports at (686) 553 69 55 ext. 101. Source: San Diego...

Mexicans González Iñárritu and Lubezki awarded special Oscar

Mexicans González Iñárritu and Lubezki awarded special Oscar

Nov 3, 2017

According to El Universal the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced on October 27 they have decided to award a special Oscar to Mexican filmmaker Alejandro González Iñárritu and Mexican cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki for “Carne y Arena” (Flesh and Sand), a project that delves into the territory of virtual reality (VR). The Academy said they decided to present the award to recognize a “visionary and powerful experience in storytelling.” It seems this is the first special Oscar awarded since the one granted to “Toy Story” in 1996. According to a statement by John Bailey, president of the Academy, Iñárritu and Lubezki “opened for us new doors of cinematic perception.” After working previously in the “Revenant” (2015) and “Birdman” (2014), Iñárritu and Lubezki partnered once more but this time to build an artistic VR experience where they place the spectator at the heart of the realities of the illegal immigrants who cross the U.S.-Mexico border. For seven minutes, the spectator becomes part of the drama of immigration, which is brought to life based on the life stories of several immigrants Iñárritu gathered. The filmmaker presented “Carne y Arena” in the latest edition of the Cannes Film Festival. Those who enter the VR installation must do so barefooted since the ground is covered in sand and this physical contact allows for an easier transition to a reality which is far-removed for many. “Virtual reality is everything cinema isn’t,” said Iñárritu during a restricted press conference in Cannes, “It’s the birth of a completely different model. Maybe an eighth art,” he claimed. The Academy will present the statuettes to Iñárritu and Lubezki during the gala celebration of the Honorary Awards November 11, at the Ray Dolby Ballroom at the Hollywood & Highland Center. Also set to be honored during this ceremony are the filmmakers Agnès Varda and Charles Burnett, actor Donald Sutherland, and cinematographer Owen Roizman. “Carne y Arena” is currently on display at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, in the United States, at the Parada Foundation in Milan, and at the Cultural Center Tlatelolco in México....

Día de Muertos – All Saints Day: two schools of thought blend into one tradition

Día de Muertos – All Saints Day: two schools of thought blend into one tradition

Nov 2, 2017

Day of the Dead is an important Mexican holiday that celebrates and honors deceased loved ones. In Mexico, the celebration is held from October 31 to November 2nd, coinciding with the Catholic feast days of All Saints and All Souls, but the festival’s origins are rooted in a combination of elements of indigenous beliefs and Catholic teachings. Over time it has evolved, adding some new ideas and practices, ultimately transcending its origins to evolve into the truly Mexican holiday that is celebrated today as Día de Muertos or Hanal Pixan in the Maya area. The celebration of the festival Dia de los Muertos (alternately known as Dia de Muertos and Dia de Todos Santos) corresponds to the observance of Hallowe’en (or the Feast of All Saints and All Souls) in other countries with significant Catholic populations. When the Spanish conquistadors arrived in the sixteenth century, they introduced the Catholic faith to the indigenous people of Mesoamerica and tried to stamp out their gods and  native religion. They were only moderately successful, and the Catholic teachings intermingled with the native beliefs to create new traditions. The preHispanic festival related to death and celebrating the ancestors was moved to coincide with the Catholic holidays of All Saints Day (November 1st) and All Souls Day (November 2nd), and although it is considered a Catholic holiday, it retains elements of the pre-Hispanic celebrations. The incorporation of Christian syncretism is most evident in the altars (altares de muertos), which draw directly from Columbian translation of symbolism. The incorporation of Christian symbols (such as the crucifix) and traditional Mexican imagery is to be expected in these altars.   Syncretism is also evident in the dates of the celebration, as November 1st and 2nd coincide with All Saints Day and All Souls Day, both Christian holidays. It is often evident in cases such as this (a Christian power coming into an indigenous, pagan civilization), that Christian holidays are overlaid into traditional celebrations and incorporated into previous cultural practices as a means of more easily assimilating Christian culture. Dia de los Muertos eclipses all other religious holidays in Mexico and serves as a link not only between life and death, but also between Mexico’s past and present. No other festival in Mexico, whether civic (Día del...

Mexican short film is finalist in NASA contest

Mexican short film is finalist in NASA contest

Oct 29, 2017

According to El Universal, the Mexican Space Agency (AEM) announced the short film “Apizaco”, from Mexican filmmaker Alex Moreno, was nominated among the thirteen finalists for the 2017 CineSpace Short Film Competition organized by NASA and the Houston Cinema Arts Society. According to a statement released by the Ministry of Communications and Transport (SCT), the General Director of the Mexican Space Agency Javier Mendieta declared this nomination is evidence of how the talent of Mexican filmmakers stands out at an international level. The short film “Apizaco” is a documentary of the story of three students from Tlaxcala – two women and one man – who competed against 120 contestants from all over the world in the Mars Trekker Global Teen Summit, another NASA contest. For his part, Alex Moreno confirmed his interest in the project came from his main inspiration, which is Mexico. “It’s about showing the thousands of success stories of our country, that are, in rare exceptions, overshadowed by sensationalism and bad news,” said the filmmaker. The CineSpace jury is formed by members of the Houston Cinema Arts Society and NASA, who are joined once more this year by Richard Linklater, filmmaker behind Oscar-nominated films such as “Boyhood.” The films will be screened at the Houston Cinema Arts Festival – taking place from November 9 to 13 – and the winners will be revealed during a ceremony at the Rice Media Center of Houston, according to Javier Mendieta....

“Day of the Dead in Mexico”, a celebration of life

“Day of the Dead in Mexico”, a celebration of life

Oct 26, 2017

For some people, death is the end, for others it is a new beginning, the passage to a new life. Mexicans celebrate the passing with “Día de Muertos”, as a celebration of life. Join us and witness the majestic colors of Mexico. Feel free to share this video on your social media platforms, blogs or websites as long as you cite The Yucatan Times as source. Video developed by The Yucatan Times...