Pedro Infante lives in the heart of all Mexicans!

Pedro Infante lives in the heart of all Mexicans!

Nov 18, 2017

Infante was born November 18, in the Mexican fishing town of Mazatlan. Apprenticed as a carpenter, he learnt music from his father, mastering the guitar, piano, violin and drums. He became renowned for his voice while touring with his father’s band, La Rabia. Pedro Infante in the 1951 film Full Speed Ahead (A toda máquina) Photo: WIKICOMMONS “Mixing feeling with technique, his soulful croon forever changed the way the mariachi was sung and he helped popularize the genre around the world,” said Google. Screen legend  Infante was one of the best-known figures in the Golden Age of Mexican Cinema, making 60 movies and recording more than 360 songs in a 14 year period. His first leading role was in the film La Feria de Las Flores in 1943, with other notable films including Ahi Viene Martin Corona and Los Hijos de Maria Morales and La Vida No Vale Nada. Infante’s iconic role in 1953’s Pepe El Toro saw him explore his  passion for boxing on screen, while in A Toda Máquina he played the role of a motorcycle cop—in a role noted for its high speed stunt sequences. Despite his fame and success, the Latin American Herald Tribune reports that Infante was renown for his modesty and willingness to help people in difficulty with financial assistance or work. The newspaper reports that he once refused service in a restaurant until he had helped the beleaguered owner finish the washing up. Infante died in 1957 in a plane crash. He was posthumously awarded a Silver Bear for Best Actor at the 7th Berlin International Film Festival for his performance in Tizoc, his last film. Today would have been his 100th birthday. Happy birthday Pedrito !!!...

Cruisers complete 2017 Baja HaHa Rally

Cruisers complete 2017 Baja HaHa Rally

Nov 17, 2017

CABO SAN LUCAS, Mexico — The large contingent of cruisers navigating the Baja California coast finally completed one of the most popular West Coast events of the year, with the Baja HaHa Rally officially in the books. Cruisers left San Diego in late October and made their respective ways down to Cabo San Lucas, where participants arrived, Nov. 11. The left San Diego on Oct. 29 and arrived at Turtle Bay a few days later; Bahia Santa Maria and Cabo San Lucas were also on the itinerary. This year’s Baja HaHa featured 154 entries, with a majority of cruisers from California or the West Coast. Other entries hailed from Alaska, Hawai’i, Nevada, Virginia, Arizona, Ohio, Illinois, New Mexico, South Carolina, New Jersey, Minnesota, Alabama, Canada, Mexico, Switzerland, Germany and The Philippines. One of the rally’s highlights was a “Where’s Poobah?” game, according to a report published on Latitude 38’s website; Latitude 38 is the organizing body of the annual Baja HaHa. The game was essentially a “Where’s Waldo?” contest, where cruisers had to spot “Poobah” – an individual wearing a flourescent orange t-shirt. Baja HaHa, of course, is also noted for hosting several parties at its stop locations, including the finale at Cabo San Lucas. The end of Baja HaHa, also, isn’t necessarily the end for some of the participants. Cabo San Lucas becomes a jumping off point to the Sea of Cortez or Pacific Ocean destinations. Boats participating in this year’s rally from Southern California included Jacquot Bateau, Day Dream, Matador, Madison3, Aeolos, Pure Grace, Dances With Winds, Sea Glass, Zoa, Green Flash, Alianza, Feleena, Firefly, True Love, La Cuna, Lanikai, Mai Tai, La Meriposa, Linda Marie, SweePea, Prana, Fellowship. Voyager, Angantyr, Sea Witch, Bonzer, Wilson, Sun Dance, Lahaina Roads, Hot Stuff, Silk Purse, Bellavia, Blessings, Pair A Dox, Mr. Beefy, Dolce and Big Moe. Latitude 38 founded Baja HaHa in 1994....

7 archaeological sites in Mexico that not many people know about

7 archaeological sites in Mexico that not many people know about

Nov 16, 2017

Mexico has a great archaeological tradition due to the number of cultures that inhabited this land before Mexico itself existed, which makes archaeology one of the most important topics when it comes to travel and tourism related activities. Obviously, we know about the prehispanic cultures that inhabited this land, however, there are many non-famous sites that are mostly overshadowed by traditional ones. We practically know the most famous pyramids and archaeological centers such as Teotihuacán, Chichén Itzá, Uxmal, Palenque, among others, leaving aside large constructions of allegedly “minor importance”, although many times, of greater beauty than the “tradicionales“. These places, alien to the general public due to lack of publicity and dificult access, are, in fact, fantastic cities that amaze anyone who ventures to reach them. All of these places stunningly beautiful and they were built in the middle of lush jungles or mountainous scenarios. Here, 7 archaeological zones in Mexico that few people know: 1. Tamtok y Tamohi, San Luis Potosí  Located at the Huasteca Potosina, the place is also a “Magical Town” (Pueblo Mágico).   2. Teotenango, Estado de México The word means “place of the holy wall” in teotihuacano tongue. It is located at the Tetépetl hills, and it is the second biggest archaeological site in the State of Mexico 3. Cañada de la Virgen, Guanajuato. Not far from San MIguel de Allende and the city of Guanajuato, La Virgen is not as popular as these known widely known tourist destinations 4. Chacchobén, Quintana Roo. When it comes to archaeological site in Quintana Roo, people always think of Tulum or Cobá, but not many know about Chacchoben, which is a huge site that features roads, pyramids, juego de pelota, and many other buildings. 5. Bonampak, Chiapas Bonampak is an ancient Maya archaeological site in the Mexican state of Chiapas, best known for its murals.   6. Calakmul, Campeche Calakmul is a Maya archaeological site in the Mexican state of Campeche, deep in the jungles of the greater Petén Basin region. 7. Yaxchilán, Chiapas Yaxchilan is an ancient Maya city located on the bank of the Usumacinta River in what is now the state of Chiapas, Mexico....

San Diego’s Natural History museum opens its drawers to public

San Diego’s Natural History museum opens its drawers to public

Nov 14, 2017

Like most museums, the Nat in Balboa Park has far more specimens in its collection than it could ever put on display. So on Nov. 18 it’s opening a new exhibition it’s billing as “cool stuff from storage.”   Stuff like the jaw from a giant sperm whale. A 20-foot-long skin from an anaconda. A wall of skulls. “Most visitors don’t get to see our treasure trove — rows upon rows of shelves, drawers and crates holding millions of plant and animal specimens,” Judy Gradwohl, president and CEO of the natural history museum, said in a statement. “A look behind the scenes in our storage areas is like a cross-section of the diversity of nature itself.” Formally titled “Unshelved,” the exhibit is drawn from the 8 million items the museum has been collecting since it was established by a small group of citizen scientists in 1874. Although the museum’s research focus is on Southern California and Baja California, some items in the collection come from all over the world, which is why the new exhibit will include an emperor penguin and huge bats, as well as taxidermied birds, tiny beetles, gems and minerals. Some of the specimens have never been exhibited before, according to museum officials. “Unshelved,” located on Level Two, will be in place for two years. The exhibit is included with the price of admission. The museum also has two companion events scheduled. Its monthly Family Day, Nov. 18 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., will feature hands-on activities and crafts for kids. On Nov. 21, at 7 p.m., museum scientists will discuss their favorite items from storage in an event called “What’s In Our Drawers.” Admission requires a separate ticket. The museum calls itself the second-oldest scientific institution in California and the third-oldest west of the Mississippi. It’s open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m, daily (closed Thanksgiving and Christmas)....

Paradisus Los Cabos raises the bar for all-inclusive resorts

Paradisus Los Cabos raises the bar for all-inclusive resorts

Nov 9, 2017

“If you need anything at all, just call this number and a butler will assist you.” Checking into Paradisus Los Cabos in San Jose del Cabo, Mexico, I tried to play it cool in the private lounge exclusive to Royal Service guests, but in reality I immediately started making a mental list of everything I could ask my butler to do. As it turned out, the service was so good across the resort the only request I made during my stay was for ice. When I was first invited to visit Paradisus Los Cabos for the weekend with a group of travel writers, my initial thought was that it was a long way to go for three nights. But as I was offered a glass of cold, refreshing bubbly by a butler during that initial check-in, I decided it was well worth the trip. I also considered the fact that the Okanagan, a favourite weekend getaway for me and my husband, is the equivalent five-hour trip from Vancouver. Grab a seat. Bar stools at Paradisus Los Cabos overlooking the Sea of Cortez. Photo Sandra Thomas And with a weekend ahead of me filled with exotic cocktails, excuisite cuisine and white sand beaches as far as the eye can see — I had to ask, what more could a sun-loving traveller ask for? The ocean-front restaurant exclusive to Royal Service guests at Paradisus Los Cabos in San Jose del Cabo, Mexico. Photo Sandra Thomas Besides butlers, the Royal Service packages offer an adults-only pool, exclusive ocean-front restaurant and lounge and beach access. The resort is also popular for its postcard worthy swim-up suites… Click here for full artcle on http://www.vancourier.com/...

Trump restricts travel, trade with Cuba with new rules

Trump restricts travel, trade with Cuba with new rules

Nov 8, 2017

The U.S. government made it tougher on Wednesday for Americans to book trips and do business with Cuba, making good on a pledge by President Donald Trump to roll back his Democratic predecessor’s move toward warmer ties with Havana. The restrictions, which take effect on Thursday, are aimed at preventing the military, intelligence and security arms of Cuba’s Communist government from benefiting from American tourists and trade, the White House said. They fill in the regulatory detail on a Trump policy speech in June, in which the Republican president called for a tightening of restrictions. Trump said then that the Cuban government continued to oppress its people and former President Barack Obama had gone too far in a 2014 diplomatic breakthrough with Washington’s former Cold War foe. The regulations include a new list of 180 government entities, holding companies, and tourism companies from which Americans are banned from doing business. The list includes 83 state-owned hotels, including famous hotels in Old Havana such as Ernest Hemingway’s erstwhile favorite haunt Hotel Ambos Mundos, as well as the city’s new luxury shopping mall. While U.S. travelers will still be able to make authorized trips to Cuba with a U.S.-based organization and accompanied by a U.S. representative of the group, it will be harder for them to travel individually, according to the new regulations. Before Obama’s opening, travel by many Americans was similarly restricted to such organized trips. Travelers need to be able to show a “full-time schedule” with activities that support Cuban people and show “meaningful interaction,” going beyond merely staying in rooms in private homes, eating in private restaurants, or shopping in private stores, an official told reporters on a conference call. The administration says it is keen to support such small private enterprises that have sprung up around the country under the Cuban government’s reforms to the largely state-controlled economy. “Staying or eating or shopping in some of those privately owned places is something that we wanted to encourage. But what we wanted to say is, that alone is not enough,” the official said. There was no immediate response to the new regulations from the Cuban government. EXISTING PLANS Business contracts and travel arrangements...