Semarnat will maintain its strategies for the protection of jaguars in Yucatan

Semarnat will maintain its strategies for the protection of jaguars in Yucatan

Jan 10, 2018

“Semarnat will maintain its strategies and programs for the protection of the population of jaguars and other big felines that still survive in the Yucatecan territory”, assured the delegate of that unit, Carlos Berlín Montero. In an interview for Notimex, he recalled that for several years now, the federal government has taken action to prevent the killing of jaguars, often related to livestock activities and on other occasions with poaching. “For several years there have been awareness programs to promote a culture of respect for this magnificent animals, especially in areas with greater livestock activity, which is sometimes affected by the fact that some specimens hunt cows to feed themselves,” Berlin explained. “This has allowed to find joint solutions with the allegedly affected farmers making them understand that the jaguar is a very important and emblematic species for our culture”, he continued. “In addition, there is insurance through which the cattle breeder only has to inform the Secretary that one of his animals was killed by a jaguar so that the loss is restored, after the usual verification that it is indeed a jaguar”, he stressed. He explained that some studies indicate that the population of jaguars is about five thousand specimens throughout the Mexican territory, however there is no precise figure of the population that lives specifically in Yucatecan territory. “However, an important presence of jaguars has been identified in the eastern area of the state; in some specific points such as the Rio Lagartos Biosphere Reserve, the coastal community of San Felipe, the jungles near Valladolid, and there is also talk of sightings in the western part of the state, very close to the State Reserve of the Palmar”, the official said. This is an indication that despite being considered a species at risk, the works for its conservation have been succesful. The official said that the possibilities of saving the jaguar in the coming decades, requires a constant effort, with a regional vision and the sum of efforts from different sectors. “As for Semarnat, we will give continuity and support to all efforts aimed at protecting this emblematic species” Berlín Montero concluded. Source:...

Marine research begins in newly designated Revillagigedo National Park

Marine research begins in newly designated Revillagigedo National Park

Jan 5, 2018

From December 3 to 9, 2017, personnel from the Marine Ecosystems Laboratory of the Autonomous University of Baja California Sur (UABCS), experts from the Revillagigedo National Park and the Baja California and North Pacific Peninsula Regional Office of the National Commission of Protected Natural Areas ( CONANP), visited 3 insular bodies of the recently declared Natural Reservoir, Revillagigedo National Park, aboard a large  Storm Vessel. During this period 12 diving expeditions were carried out in a period of 5 days. On the crossing to the islands of Socorro, San Benedicto and Roca Partida, censuses of fish, large pelagics, invertebrates, birds, marine mammals and sea turtle nesting sites were detected and monitored. As well as the coral reef conditions and the impact that recreational diving could bring to the area. A geo reference of beaches and other relevant sites was conducted as well. After the designation of the Revillagigedo National Park by President Enrique Peña Nieto on November 27, 2017, this is the first exploratory survey of public use and biological censuses in order to obtain information for the preparation of a long term marine monitoring project. The plan contemplates the inclusion of indicators of the effects of climate change, which will provide information that will be used for the management of public use programs of this Natural Protected Area (ANP). The impact data of the diving and reaction of the species will be integrated into the load capacity study for the area carried out in 2015 by M. en C. Patricia Alexandra Álvarez del Castillo Cárdenas. The Revillagigedo Archipelago is located in the eastern Pacific Ocean 386 km southwest of the southern tip of the Baja California peninsula, 600 km off the coast of the state of Colima and approximately 386 km south of Cabo San Lucas, B.C.S. It is formed by the islands of San Benedicto, Socorro, Clarión and the islet of Roca Partida with its corresponding adjacent waters. The islands make up a habitat of vital importance for various endemic species of flora and fauna, particularly sea birds. The surrounding waters represent an exceptional convergence of two marine biogeographic regions: the Northeast Pacific and the Eastern Pacific. This Protected Natural Area is at the crossroads where...

Illegal fishermen shoot environmentalists’ drone

Illegal fishermen shoot environmentalists’ drone

Dec 29, 2017

Eighteen shots were fired at a drone from the environmental group Sea Shepherd when it carried out inspection and surveillance actions in the waters of the Sea of ​​Cortez. The detonations knocked down the drone when it was flying over a boat of allegd furtive fishermen hunting for totoaba fish, and while they were picking up the gill net, the drone caught them in flagrante delicto during the night of Sunday. The Sea Shepherd’s captain observed through the radar three boats at 9:30 p.m. on December 24 when they were going into the protected area, so he gave the order to send the surveillance drone to detect in night vision the image of the fishermen and catch them in the act of illegal fishing. The fact was recorded by the drone’s camera, as one of the fishermen who held a firearm in his hands, can be seen pulling the trigger five times against the drone without hitting it. The batteries were then replaced to fly over a second vessel 1.4 nautical miles away, which fired on thirteen occasions before the screen marked “disconnected”. “We will not go anywhere,” commented the captain, “they will not intimidate us with this type of threat. The vaquita needs us and also the long list of species attacked by illegal fishermen in the Sea of Cortez. While there are illegal nets in these waters, the Sea Shepherd will be there to take them out of the sea. ” Source:...

Newlywed is attacked by a shark on her honeymoon

Newlywed is attacked by a shark on her honeymoon

Dec 12, 2017

A couple of newlyweds from the United States lived a dangerous honeymoon in the Caribbean, after the man recorded the moment when a shark attacked his wife while snorkeling. In the recording you can see how Sarah Illig is bitten in one of her arms by the shark when she was swimming in a school of fish. According to the UK based newspaper The Mirror, Sarah thought it was a joke of her partner but after the attack, her reaction was horror and then she swam away terrified. Speaking to the British newspaper, Sarah said that while she was snorkeling she felt a whistle of water, something in her arm and thought that her husband was playing a joke on her. However, seconds later she realized that her arm hurted: “I looked beyond where my protective glasses blocked my side vision and saw the shark attached to my arm.” Source:...

90 percent of the grey whales on the planet are born in Baja Sur

90 percent of the grey whales on the planet are born in Baja Sur

Dec 7, 2017

Gray whales make one of the longest migrations of any mammal on earth. Every year of their lives they swim more than 10,000 miles roundtrip, between nursery lagoons in Mexico to feeding grounds in the Arctic. The gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus) visits the Ojo de Liebre Lagoons in Baja California Sur, in order to reproduce in the warm waters of Mexico. In a statement, the National Commission of Natural Protected Areas (CONANP) reported that 90 percent of the whales of this species on the planet, are born in this Natural Protected Area (ANP) of Baja California Sur. The Gray Whale Migration begins with pregnant mothers leaving the Bering Strait in October for their breeding grounds in Baja, Mexico. They are followed by the general population, and then juvenile whales who all head south for the warmer, safer waters of three Mexican lagoons: St. Ignacio, Magdalena, and Ojo de Liebre (also known as Scammons). By the third week of January vast numbers of whales can be seen heading south. Around mid-February, the whales can be seen heading north again, and they continue to travel until April, when the mothers return with their calves. The pairs must cross over the cavernous canyon where killer whales lie in wait and often attack the calves. National Geographic, BBC and other international film crews flock to California and Baja California to film this exciting wildlife footage. Mothers can save their young if they can head to shallow waters, and the chase is spectacular. Sources: OEM...

Whale Watching Season Begins in Baja California Sur

Whale Watching Season Begins in Baja California Sur

Nov 24, 2017

Whale season is getting underway in the Mexican Pacific, and Baja California Sur (BCS) is the place to be. “The opportunities for whale encounters here are truly exceptional. We have the blue whale, the largest mammal on earth. We also have grays, humpback, fin, minke and pilots,” Bryan Jauregui tells Travel Agent. Juaregui and her husband operate the boutique hotel Los Colibris Casitas, in Todos Santos. They also own Todos Santos Eco Adventures. Todos Santos is a small Pueblo Magico, or Magic Town, located 45 miles up the coast from Cabo San Lucas. It’s about a 75-minute drive from the San Jose del Cabo Airport, and a 45-minute drive from Cabo San Lucas. The destination attracts nature lovers and surfers throughout the year. But, whale season offers extra incentive to visit. Humpbacks are usually the first whales to visit Todos Santos and environs. They arrive in October, stay through January and return in April. They’re known for their acrobatic breaching out of the water, to the delight of observers.   Gray whale sightings typically begin in BCS mid-January. The whales arrive to give birth in calm lagoons, then head back to their Alaskan feeding grounds with their young. It’s a 12,000-mile round trip. Encounters with them and their babies are nothing short of “transformative,” said Juaregui. The whales give birth in Magdalena Bay, one of the most important wetlands ecosystems in North America. “From the third week of January to mid-March, we have a two-day one-night trip there. We do six hours of whale watching in small boats. The mothers bring their babies up to us. You can put your hand out and touch them. To encounter these giant, but benign creatures in this setting is a spiritual experience,” said Juaregui. Her company also operates a luxury tent camp on Isla Espiritu Santo in the Sea of Cortez. The island is part of a UNESCO World Heritage site, and one of the world’s best marine and bird-viewing destinations....