The real Super-Moon can be observed on January 1st

The real Super-Moon can be observed on January 1st

Dec 9, 2017

Eddie Salazar Gamboa, a recognized Yucatecan astronomer, talks about the characteristics of the ‘Super-Moon’ and when the next one will occur… MERIDA – The real Super-Moon can be observed on January 1st, 2018, when the full moon stage corresponds with the perigee (its shortest distance to the earth),” said the specialist Eddie Salazar Gamboa. In an interview with the Diario de Yucatán, the renowned Yucatecan astronomer commented that the full moon of Sunday December 3rd, wasn’t really a Super Moon, because it has so much less light than one than will be seen next January 1st. (Photo: Diario de Yucatán) “To be considered a Super Moon, the natural satellite of the Earth must be 100% full at the same time as the perigee, that is, the closest point to our planet and in the case of the moon of this December 3 there was a lag of 12 hours away from the perigee,” he said. That is to say, the full moon occurred at about 9 o’clock in the morning of Mexico and the perigee at 10 o’clock on the same day, he said. In the case of the moon of January 1st, 2018, the difference between the perigee and the exact moment of the full moon is two hours, that will make it look at least 20% brighter, than a common full moon, so it is enough to be considered as a Super Moon, he said. (Image: www.vox.com) He recalled that he registered under the Federal Copyright Law a study that he made in 2014 on the Super Moons, and in this study is the calculation of these phenomena from 2011 and until 2020, and it excludes of these category the full moons of December 3 and even the one of December 31. He clarified that these phenomena don’t occur every year and that the last one that he has registered was on November 14, 2016. He revealed that in addition to the Super Moon on the first day of 2018, there will be a full moon on January 31 which will be “blue”, because it is the second full moon in the same month, and in addition there will also be a...

Mexicali is promoted as the “Capital of date”

Mexicali is promoted as the “Capital of date”

Dec 8, 2017

Agricultural authorities of the state have promoted conferences and field practices with experts, in order to position Mexicali as the capital of date. The undersecretary of Agricultural Development (Sedagro), Angel Lopez Lopez, explained that this has been promoted for its establishment, commercialization and the benefits of this fruit has to offer. He said that the main objective of the training is to continue promoting the date in the valley of Mexicali. A total of 128 certificates were delivered to speakers and program attendees. “This program consisted of five sessions, one every 15 days, where participants discussed technical-informative, post-harvest, marketing and financing topics”, said the Baja California government official. López mentioned that they have driven more than 40 thousand date palms, which meant a statewide-producer investment for the benefit of 88 producers with 260 hectares. He said that the effort made by the Dátil Product System during the talks and working sessions with the National Institute of Forestry, Agriculture and Livestock was also recognized. The undersecretary also highlighted the coordinated work with the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock, Rural Development, Fisheries and Food (Sagarpa) and institutions of the agricultural...

Second crater found inside Popocatepetl volcano

Second crater found inside Popocatepetl volcano

Nov 28, 2017

The National Center for Disaster Prevention (Centro Nacional de Prevención de Desastres: Cenapred) shared a video of the flyby they made on Sunday November 26 above the Popocatépetl volcano, where a second crater was discovered inside the volcano’s main crater. The director of Cenapred, Carlos Valdés, announced that the interior crater has a diameter of 370 meters and is 110 meters deep. “This crater has no dome. It is considered an open system, which facilitates the constant release of ash emissions, “Valdés wrote through his Twitter account. The dependency revealed that in the coming days it is expected that the volcano will continue to spit ashes and incandescent material towards the surface and that gradually, the internal crater will be filled, at least partially, by a new lava dome. Therefore, the Cenapred exhorted not to approach the volcano and especially the crater, because of the danger involved in the fall of ballistic fragments. In addition, Valdés informed that in case of heavy rains, locals should stay away from the near canyons and ravines, where landslides and mudflows could be seen. The “Popocatepetl” volcanic warning light is currently in YELLOW (Phase 2). Source: Diario de...

Revillagigedo is now officially a National Park and natural protected area

Revillagigedo is now officially a National Park and natural protected area

Nov 27, 2017

Friday November 24, 2017 is a historic day for Mexico’s natural heritage, as President Enrique Peña Nieto signed the decree of the Revillagigedo National Park. Finally, Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto signed the Decree of the Revillagigedo National Park (Parque Nacional Revillagigedo). This turns Revillagigedo into the largest totally protected marine park in North America, with an area of 14,808,780 hectares. In the current administration, six Natural Protected Areas and five safeguard zones have been decreed, equivalent to just over 65 million hectares, almost triple the territory that was protected at the beginning of this sexenio. Mexico has reached a total of 182 Protected Natural Areas that together cover about 91 million hectares, almost 70 million in marine areas and 21 million in terrestrial areas. The Revillagigedo Islands are home to endemic plant and animal species, and are sometimes called Mexico’s “little Galápagos.” The Mexican Government established the islands as a Biosphere Reserve on June 4, 1994. The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) declared the Archipelago of Revillagigedo Patrimonio in 2016.   Parque Nacional #Revillagigedo es ahora conectividad ecológica a gran escala. Sus aguas tropicales, que circulan de oeste a este, favorecen la conexión biológica con otras áreas marinas protegidas y sitios del Patrimonio @UNESCO. http://bit.ly/2BlwVae . Con el decreto del Parque Nacional #Revillagigedo se garantiza la protección de especies marinas únicas, como mantarrayas y...

The people of Southern California and northern Baja California waiting for “The Big One”

The people of Southern California and northern Baja California waiting for “The Big One”

Nov 14, 2017

A 4.6-magnitude earthquake hit Monterey County in California on Monday November 13 —and it was felt as far as 90 miles away in San Francisco.  The earthquake occurred near the San Andreas Fault at a depth of about four miles. No injuries or damage were reported, and as of Monday evening, the U.S. Geological Survey reported a low likelihood of causalities and damage. The structures in this area are highly resistant to earthquake shaking, according to the USGS, but some vulnerable structures exist. The quake was felt as a weak or light earthquake as far as San Francisco, but moderate shakes were reported by the USGS in areas with a very low population. The earthquake hit at 11:31 a.m. Monday November 13, about 13 miles northeast of Gonzales, California. The quake had nine smaller aftershocks—the strongest aftershock measuring at a 2.8-magnitude, Annemarie Baltay, a seismologist with the U.S. Geological Survey told SFGate. The earthquake epicenter was in rural areas of mountains between the Salinas Valley and the San Joaquin Valley, the Los Angeles Times reported. A kid touches a crack on a wall at his damaged home in the community of Oaxaca, on the outskirts of Mexicali April 7, 2010. Scared families south of the Mexico-California border readied to sleep outside for a second night on Monday after a big earthquake tore cracks in roads and houses and dozens of aftershocks rattled the area. Reuters Baltay told SFGate that this type of earthquake is typical behavior. “It’s as if someone put an oil can into the fault and lubricated it,” she said. The San Andreas Fault runs from the Gulf of California north to the region of Cape Mendocino. In the San Francisco Bay Area, the slip rate on the fault is about four-fifths of an inch each year, according to the USGS. October 1989 was when the last major earthquake—Loma Prieta—associated with the San Andreas Fault occurred. Back then, that earthquake resulted in 64 deaths, and additionally, 16,000 homes and apartment units were damaged and rendered uninhabitable. In the wake of the deadly earthquake in Iran and Iraq—which measured at a magnitude of 7.3—the next big earthquake in California has long been a looming concern. In Southern California—where the most recent moderate earthquake hit—there...

San Diego’s Natural History museum opens its drawers to public

San Diego’s Natural History museum opens its drawers to public

Nov 14, 2017

Like most museums, the Nat in Balboa Park has far more specimens in its collection than it could ever put on display. So on Nov. 18 it’s opening a new exhibition it’s billing as “cool stuff from storage.”   Stuff like the jaw from a giant sperm whale. A 20-foot-long skin from an anaconda. A wall of skulls. “Most visitors don’t get to see our treasure trove — rows upon rows of shelves, drawers and crates holding millions of plant and animal specimens,” Judy Gradwohl, president and CEO of the natural history museum, said in a statement. “A look behind the scenes in our storage areas is like a cross-section of the diversity of nature itself.” Formally titled “Unshelved,” the exhibit is drawn from the 8 million items the museum has been collecting since it was established by a small group of citizen scientists in 1874. Although the museum’s research focus is on Southern California and Baja California, some items in the collection come from all over the world, which is why the new exhibit will include an emperor penguin and huge bats, as well as taxidermied birds, tiny beetles, gems and minerals. Some of the specimens have never been exhibited before, according to museum officials. “Unshelved,” located on Level Two, will be in place for two years. The exhibit is included with the price of admission. The museum also has two companion events scheduled. Its monthly Family Day, Nov. 18 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., will feature hands-on activities and crafts for kids. On Nov. 21, at 7 p.m., museum scientists will discuss their favorite items from storage in an event called “What’s In Our Drawers.” Admission requires a separate ticket. The museum calls itself the second-oldest scientific institution in California and the third-oldest west of the Mississippi. It’s open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m, daily (closed Thanksgiving and Christmas)....