Shockwave and burning powder: Double damage that can change your life

Shockwave and burning powder: Double damage that can change your life

Dec 31, 2017

ALFREDO AZCARATE VARELA THE BAJA POST/EDITOR (WARNING: EXPLICIT IMAGES) The shockwave of a firecracker’s explosion can cause severe damage to the hand and then the powder burn, is a double harm which leaves lifetime marks crippling children as well as adults “playing”  with fireworks, said Dr. Jose Andres Azcárate Varela, plastic surgeon who has treated several firecracker accident victims. HE thinks it’s a very high price which they will pay for a lifetime for an absurd and silly momentary lapse of “fun”, and there is also the pollution issue, harming the air quality, having serious effect on dogs’ sensitive hearing, the airborne particles they leave behind, and it’s enough to see the pictures and the video to see how dangerous this “game” could be. (Photographs courtesy of Dr. José Andrés Azcárate Varela personal archive)...

I grow pot in California for a living. I’m worried about legalization

I grow pot in California for a living. I’m worried about legalization

Dec 30, 2017

As the daughter of a back-to-the-land homesteader and pot farmer, I learned never to speak of what my father did. We lived a simple life in times when only growing a few plants could sustain us. “Say I am a retired schoolteacher,” he lectured. “You don’t want to have to come visit your daddy in jail, do you?” It’s only recently that I can publicly tell stories from my childhood, of when my dad would pull me into the shade to hide from low-flying helicopters searching for cannabis patches across the hills of Mendocino County, California. In 1976, he began supporting our family as a black-market grower, planting blackberry bushes and building platforms in the trees to shield his plants from the local marijuana eradication team. When my husband and I began growing, we used the same techniques, tunneling through the blackberries to keep our plants hidden. We now support our two kids, ages 17 and 10, in the market that took shape when California legalized medical marijuana two decades ago. On Jan. 1, we can come into the sunlight as the Adult Use of Marijuana Act takes effect across California, legalizing recreational cannabis for adults 21 and older. Yet after waiting so long for the trophy of legalization, to finally be free in our lifestyle choice to live off the land, I can’t help but wonder: Will small farmers like me be wiped out by big business? Yes, New Year’s will be a day of celebration for many, including tech billionaire Sean Parker, who helped bankroll the Proposition 64 campaign to end cannabis prohibition in the sixth-largest economy in the world. Recreational use is now legal in every state along the West Coast. With California poised to earn up to $1 billion in tax revenue, other states likely will follow our lead, which could spur calls for a change in federal law. After Vietnam, many forward-thinking college graduates like my father, who’d had enough of the government and its wars, moved out to the mountains here. This was the baby-boomer generation – hippies, Deadheads and flower children who decided the mainstream way wasn’t working for them. They wanted freedom, peace and quiet. My father...

LAJA a culinary reference for world famous chefs in the heart of the Guadalupe Valley

LAJA a culinary reference for world famous chefs in the heart of the Guadalupe Valley

Dec 30, 2017

“It’s worth the journey just to eat the vegetable tostada,” said Noma chef René Redzepi, referring to the secret, off-menu dish at Laja, a restaurant in Mexico’s Valle de Guadalupe. But 16 years ago, when Laja’s owner and executive chef, Jair Téllez, opened the place—in the middle of nowhere as he describes it—he never imagined it would become a food destination loved by the likes of Redzepi, Nancy Silverton, and Anthony Bourdain. Valle de Guadalupe, the wine country of Mexico’s Baja California peninsula, is a 4-hour drive from Los Angeles. It got its start in the 18th century when priests first planted wine grapes there. Baja’s Mediterranean climate and porous soil eventually proved fertile, and wineries began to sprout in the 1970s. The first tourism boom was in 2006, and now the region has upward of 100 wineries. With Laja, Téllez inspired many more chefs to open their own farm-to-table restaurants, including David Castro Hussong, who once worked for him and then left for prodigious kitchens such as New York’s Eleven Madison Park and Blue Hill at Stone Barns. Castro returned to the valley last year to open Fauna, a restaurant inside the sleek new resort Bruma, adding the flavors of his own journey to this burgeoning gustatory destination....

Haiti – Diaspora : 9 marriages and 39 births of Haitians in Baja California

Haiti – Diaspora : 9 marriages and 39 births of Haitians in Baja California

Dec 30, 2017

The Haitian community that has arrived in Baja California is continuing its integration process. On December 16th, 8 couples were married under Haitian laws. For these legal and religious unions to be valid, they were led by the Haitian authorities represented by the Ambassador of Haiti to Mexico, Guy Lamothe, Garvey Jeann Pierre, Minister Counselor of the Embassy of Haiti in Mexico and Nesly Numa, First Secretary for Consular Affairs of the Embassy of Haiti. “These unions were carried out with the aim of preserving Haitian culture and tradition, as well as strengthening a process of integration into Baja California society,” the Haitian authorities in Mexico said. The unions this weekend are not the first in this new Haitian community, according to the official register, 9 marriages with contracting parties of both countries under Mexican law have already taken place. 39 births born to Haitian parents who arrived in Baja California are also included in state registers. According to the General Secretariat of the Government of Baja California, the state has welcomed nearly 21,000 Haitian migrants, of whom nearly 17,800 have crossed into the United States. Of the estimated 3,000 Haitians who remained in Mexico, 2,890 obtained regular migratory status and 2,085 legally work in the state. TBP...

The police chief of El Centro California retires

The police chief of El Centro California retires

Dec 29, 2017

As of this Friday December 29, the Police Department of El Centro, California, will be left without a police chief, after the retirement of Eddy Silva Madueño, according to the corporation. The now former Chief of Police would’ve completed 34 years of service on February 10 within the corporation, while in his position as head of the Department would fulfill little more than 3 years. The resignation of Silva Madueño had been planned since early December by the city of El Centro, which currently seeks to fill the vacancy of police chief through an external agency. During his career, Madueño worked as an agent in different areas of law enforcement, among them as a uniformed officer, Investigations detective, member of the SWAT team and he also occupied diverse administrative positions, besides being a veteran of the armed forces of the United States. So far the city of El Centro has not announced the candidates to succeed Silva...