U.S. Army releases new hand gun, easier to operate and far more lethal

U.S. Army releases new hand gun, easier to operate and far more lethal

Nov 30, 2017

According to Newsweek, millions of U.S. Army soldiers will get more lethal handguns as part of a half-billion, decade-long project, the first upgrade to the standard M9 sidearm in more than three decades. The new M17 pistol—and a compact version called the M18—arrived at the 101st Airborne’s Fort Campbell, Kentucky, base on November 28. A small number of soldiers got to fire the new weapon straight out of the box, Military Times reports. “It is easier to fire and simpler to operate,” Sergeant Matthew J. Marsh said in a statement released by the Army. “The pistol felt very natural in my hand. I am excited to take my experience back to my unit and share it with my soldiers.” Initially, the weapon is only being offered to team leaders, but all Army units will get the M17 to replace the standard M9 Beretta over the next decade. The M17 is a variant of SIG Sauer’s P320 handgun. In January, the New Hampshire–based SIG Sauer won the 10-year, $580 million contract with the U.S. Army. The M9 has become “pretty dated technology,” said Lieutenant Colonel Steven Power, who oversees part of the weapon upgrade. “The specific performance improvements from [the M17 and M18] over the M9 include better accuracy, tighter dispersion, and better ergonomics, which combined result in a far more lethal pistol.” The new handguns are equipped with an external safety, self-illuminating sights for low-light conditions, an integrated rail for attaching accessories and an Army standard suppressor conversion kit to attach an acoustic/flash suppressor, according to the U.S. Army. Soldiers seem quite happy with the handgun thus far. “I never thought I would be one of the first ones to field a new piece of [Army] equipment,” Marsh said. “It is a tremendous honor for my battalion and brigade, this division and me.”...

Wave of violence shocks the state of Guanajuato

Wave of violence shocks the state of Guanajuato

Nov 30, 2017

Guanajuato businessmen urged authorities to take control of the insecurity situation that prevails in the state, they claim to be alarmed by the increasing violence that plagues Guanajuato. In just two days, Monday 27 and Tuesday 28, November ; 26 murders occurred in the state. On Wednesday November 29 there were four other homicides. And Irapuato lived a violent dawn, with threats and shootings. In Leon, a man shot last week died. Two people who were injured in the attack, in Santa Rosa de Lima, refused to file a complaint for fear of reprisals. The president of the Coparmex, Jorge Ramírez Hernández, said that on Monday he expressed his great concern about the violence to the Secretary of Government, Gustavo Rodríguez Junquera. The Japanese Consul, Yasuhisa Suzuki, also expressed his deep concern about the insecurity. “I understand that in January the military police will arrive, which will be based in Irapuato, that more than 3,000 (military police) are expected, we greatly appreciate the effort to carry out this project,” the Japanese govenment representative said. Meanwhile, José Arturo Sanchez, of the Business Coordinating Council of León (Consejo Coordinador Empresarial de León), said that the state of Guanajuato has become an attractive region for organized crime and it will be difficult to eradicate these criminals. Source: AM...

Trump’s wall prototypes are in place on the Tijuana border

Trump’s wall prototypes are in place on the Tijuana border

Nov 30, 2017

President Donald Trump’s “big, beautiful” wall is beginning to take shape with the construction of eight 30-foot prototypes in San Diego, driving intriguing reactions along a section of the border lined with homes, parking lots, dumped waste and burned cars. The border wall prototypes are in Otay Mesa, a small community south of Diego, along an area of Tijuana where a 10-foot corrugated metal wall already exists. Made of concrete, thick metal poles and other materials, the sample sections were completed a few weeks ago. One wall has a gray surface textured with patterns of different-sized bricks. A steel plate sits atop the wall with metal spikes. The prototypes are the first tangible signs of a controversial pledge that helped Trump get elected. Some Tijuana residents say they’re symbols of racism. But others who live a few yards from the prototypes seem indifferent to them. After all, they say, a U.S.-Mexico border wall is nothing new here. Children and teenagers with backpacks walk past the towering prototypes without even looking up. Many who live a little farther away seem unaware of the eight new structures. “They don’t bother me,” said Cesar Gonzalez, 60, whose house in Tijuana is adjacent to the prototypes. “If Trump wants to shut in his people, well, he should do it. Here, it doesn’t affect me.” But Gonzalez, a plant salesman, was skeptical of the wall’s impact. “There are going to be people who will cross by boat, airplane, tunnel, submarine,” he said, adding that in the past five years he’s seen a decrease in the number of people crossing the border near his home. Maria Elena Valenzuela, 40, who was born in San Diego and grew up on both sides of the Tijuana border, had a stronger reaction to the prototypes. “They’re horrible,” she said. Valenzuela’s grandfather worked for the railroads in the United States. Her father was a guest worker, or bracero, in California. And she worked as a high school teacher and administrator at schools across California.   Click here for full article on Mercury News...

Mexico Economy Minister says U.S. NAFTA autos proposal ‘Not Viable’

Mexico Economy Minister says U.S. NAFTA autos proposal ‘Not Viable’

Nov 30, 2017

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Mexican Economy Minister Ildefonso Guajardo said on Wednesday that demands by the Trump administration for a U.S.-specific automotive content requirement in NAFTA was “not viable,” and declined to specify when Mexico would formally respond. At a news conference following a series of meetings with senior U.S. trade officials and lawmakers in Washington, Guajardo said that Mexico was still trying to understand the U.S. proposals that would require 50 percent of vehicles’ value content be produced in the United States as part of updated North American Free Trade Agreement rules. “I was clear that the domestic content (requirement) is something that is not viable at this point,” Guajardo said. He added that Mexico would eventually make a counterproposal on automotive rules of origin, but declined to specify the timing of that response. His visit was partly aimed at bolstering support in Congress for NAFTA at a time when tax legislation is consuming lawmakers’ attention and U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer is growing frustrated with the slow pace of NAFTA talks. U.S. President Donald Trump has repeatedly threatened to scrap the trade agreement if it cannot be renegotiated to shrink U.S. trade deficits and return manufacturing jobs to the United States. House Speaker Paul Ryan said after meeting with Guajardo earlier on Wednesday NOvember 29 that congressional Republicans “are determined” to strengthen trade ties with Mexico.   Click here for full article on money.usnews.com...

Massimo workers get financial aid from City Councilor Martinez: 25 thousand 575 pesos

Massimo workers get financial aid from City Councilor Martinez: 25 thousand 575 pesos

Nov 29, 2017

Financial support for 25 single mothers and 3 young student/workers in Massimo (a maquila operating in Mexicali) for about 25 thousand 575 pesos, were delivered by Mexicali City Councilor, Alejandro Martinez Estrada in an act which was held in the audiovisual meeting room of the company in a Mexicali Industrial Park at the end of the workday. “I want to make understood that this money we give you today as a small financial aid for you, this money doesn’t belong to Mayor Gustavo Sanchez or to me, it is not ours but yours” said Councilor Martinez when he was about to start handing out the checks to the beneficiaries, with Human Resources executives witnessing the occasion. Martinez Estrada explained that the money comes from the taxes that they pay and that Martinez and his staff have lobbied and negotiated in order to get the resources and give them to the workers who are single mothers and workers that also attend...