3 seaside retirement towns in Mexico within driving distance of the U.S.

3 seaside retirement towns in Mexico within driving distance of the U.S.

Oct 31, 2017

One of the most valuable conveniences you could hope for when purchasing a home abroad is the ability to load up the car and drive to it. That’s one of Mexico’s biggest advantages for Americans interested in retirement overseas. Anyone who has driven to western Mexico from the U.S. has likely skirted along the Sea of Cortez. The Sea of Cortez is the body of water that separates Baja California from the Mexican mainland. It’s also known as the Gulf of California. It starts at the mouth of the Colorado River. The sea is noted for its warm, calm and relatively protected waters and for being one of the most biologically diverse seas on earth. Several popular retirement spots are located on the Sea of Cortez, all within a day’s drive of the U.S. border: San Felipe, Puerto Peñasco or San Carlos. These towns are quite different from each other, but they also have several things in common. They all enjoy the convenience of U.S. franchises, big-box stores and U.S. products. Many people in these places speak English, including virtually all service providers, and each location has a large English-speaking expat community. The weather is just about perfect in the winter, with balmy days and cool nights, but it’s far from perfect in the summer. Fishing is great on the sea and a big tourism draw to the area. Property taxes are also low, even on the beach. Here are three attractive retirement choices just south of the border: San Felipe San Felipe is a town on the bay of San Felipe in the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez) in the Mexican state of Baja California, 190 km south of the United States border and within the municipality of Mexicali. San Felipe is just 242 miles southeast of San Diego CA, a 4 hour drive. The Bay of San Felipe is 3 meters above sea level. At low tide, the water can recede as much as 2 km. San Felipe experiences one of the largest tidal bores in the world due in part to the Colorado River delta to the north. The seven-meter tides expose a kilometer of ocean floor. The port of San Felipe is a small town historically dependent on fishing and now on tourism, catering mostly to U.S. travelers and boasting an international airport. The...

From Los Cabos to Cancun, violence is keeping tourists away: Chicago Tribune

From Los Cabos to Cancun, violence is keeping tourists away: Chicago Tribune

Oct 31, 2017

In the spring break capital of Cancun, Quintana Roo, hotel occupancy has tumbled 10 percent this year. As bad as that is, over in Los Cabos, on the tip of the Baja California peninsula, it’s even worse. The airport serving Cabo San Lucas and its lesser-known sister city, San Jose del Cabo, is looking emptier these days. And hotel guests have canceled 35,000 nights of bookings over the next year – collectively a decade’s worth of visits for a single traveler. At a time when the weaker peso should be luring American travelers in droves, many are staying away, spooked by a wave of violence that’s come dangerously close to tourist hot spots. Gunmen opened fire at a Cancun nightclub in November, and a cooler with two human heads was found on Cabo San Lucas’s main hotel strip in June. But the biggest blow came on Aug. 22, when the U.S. State Department issued a travel warning advising tourists to steer clear altogether. “Group tourism automatically went down the moment the warning hit,” said Carlos Gosselin, head of the hotel association for Cancun and Puerto Morelos. Many insurance companies likely won’t even consider offering coverage in areas under advisory, hurting conventions and events in the area, he said. Mexico is reinforcing security in popular tourist spots to get the State Department to revise its views, and companies including Hilton Worldwide and Marriott International are spending millions to make guests feel safer. Their motivation is clear: Barclays estimates that a drop in tourism could wipe out as much as 0.5 percentage point from Mexico’s gross domestic product growth this year. Click here for full article on the Chicago Tribune...

“Marychuy” indigenous presidential candidate draws surprising support in Mexico

“Marychuy” indigenous presidential candidate draws surprising support in Mexico

Oct 31, 2017

Finalmente fueron 86 las solicitudes ante el Instituto Nacional Electoral de aspirantes a ser candidatos sin partido a la presidencia de la República, de las cuales 40 se han declarado procedentes y 38 más están pendientes de resolución por tener que responder algún requerimiento de la institución. Pero sólo una de todas esas precandidaturas tiene claramente un sentido social y colectivo, más allá de intereses personales o de pe queños grupos. Se trata, desde luego, de la propuesta del Congreso Nacional Indígena y el Ejército Zapatista de Liberación Nacional, María de Jesús Patricio Martínez, conocida familiarmente como Marichuy, una indígena nahua originaria del Estado de Jalisco, dedicada a la medicina tradicional y que ha tenido una larga participación en el movimiento indígena del país. La propuesta política del CNI y EZLN, organizados ahora como Consejo de Gobierno Indígena (ya que no se integró la totalidad de los organismos que conforman el CNI), presenta varias aristas de interés, dignas de comentarse. La más evidente, desde luego, es la decisión de estos organismos y otros colectivos que se les están adhiriendo, de abandonar su posición hasta hace muy poco antielectoral y aventurarse en este terreno para ellos nuevo, dominado por los aparatos y burocracias de los grandes partidos. Aunque hace ya más de un año que el movimiento indígena nacional anunció su intención de consultar y promover este tipo de participación, no deja de sorprender que haya logrado en breve tiempo el consenso para lanzar la candidatura de una mujer indígena a la presidencia. No olvidemos que, en particular el EZLN, no ha renunciado nunca a ser un movimiento armado, aunque no se hayan usado sus armas desde hace más de dos décadas. La incógnita es si esta nueva etapa y esta nueva empresa será de algún modo un proceso de institucionalización, equivalente a los que se vivieron en El Salvador o Colombia, pero en este caso sin un proceso de diálogo entre la guerrilla y el gobierno. Lo que es claro es que sí ha habido una larga tregua entre ambas partes y que hoy el movimiento armado no tiene ya perspectivas como tal. Pero la presencia del EZ, y el hecho de que Marichuy esté iniciando su...

President counselor of the State Electoral Institute reviews electoral materials in custody

President counselor of the State Electoral Institute reviews electoral materials in custody

Oct 31, 2017

The surveillance to the electoral material for the last process (2015-2016) which is safeguarded in the warehouse of the State Electoral Institute (IEE in Spanish) was headed by the Council President, Custodio Ramos Mendoza. Ramos and the President of Electoral Process, Helga Casanova, visited the warehouse to supervise the safe keeping of electoral materials, such as partitions for electoral booths, vote containers, shelves among other objects which will be destroyed according to electoral law and after a thorough verification. Counselor President Ramos said that the materials need to be classified and verified before being destroyed in order to determine if there is probability to reuse some of them to save money to the Institute in the forthcoming electoral process. Finally, he said that the procedures to destroy these materials will be validated in the first instance by the Executive General Joint Chief of Staff of the Institute, so they can be sent to be reviewed and approved or rejected in the Electoral Process Commission and finally the...

Expensive, bad gasoline and amnesiac journalists

Expensive, bad gasoline and amnesiac journalists

Oct 31, 2017

ALFREDO AZARATE VARELA THE BAJA POST/EDITOR Mexican gasoline in Mexicali, as all over Mexico, is bad and expensive, and the national gas stations could be destroyed by the foreign companies coming to our country with “better and cheaper fuel” that the so called Energetic Amendment advertised as a fact which never came true, because “refining gasoline is no business” as a former journalist who has found shelter in the system he used to criticize used to say before he “changed jackets”. Mexican gasoline is bad and the excuse of certain characters and “butt kissers” is that refining is not a good business, a pathetic argument of a former journalist who now works for the Federal Government doing everything he used to hate and criticize form his absolute judge bench from where he used to manage his realm of absolute truth, that is Mexico. Now he works in a fancy office, installed in his amnesiac comfort and, most likely, could be part of some “new company” arriving to the hertz waves of Mexicali, even though (obviously) he might deny it, regretfully not everyone sees the manner in which he went from pointing out the system to its defense but getting everything ready  and set up for his return to the radio when the Federal Tit dries up, sheltered by a “new” company flowing through the Hertz and Megahertz of...