Mexican and U.S. poets share works on migration at border conference

Mexican and U.S. poets share works on migration at border conference

Oct 31, 2016

SAN LUIS RIO COLORADO, Sonora — Writers from Mexico and the United States took to the streets of this Mexican city and neighboring San Luis, Arizona, to read their work to pedestrians, accompanied by musicians, during the 9th International Meeting of Migrant Poets. On Main Streets in the neighboring cities, near to the international border, the activities were held interchangeably on both sides of the border between Sonora and Arizona. At the beginning, the writer from Sonora, Beda Dominguez, read some of her poems, while the YouthBuild group from Arizona, performed songs related to the theme of migration. In various forums, participants recalled the presence of Mexican migrants, Central Americans, Africans and Haitians who daily arrive to the border of Sonora to seek the American dream in the United States. More than 50 writers from Mexico, Canada and the United States participated in poetry reading activities on the cities’ streets and on campuses, as well as book presentations, conferences, and plays’ distribution in the vicinity of the international border. In addition, artists of this binational region were invited to present their work at the headquarters during the activities development, in addition to musical and cultural groups’ events. Source:...

“I do not wake up every morning thinking how to “screw” Mexico”: Peña Nieto

“I do not wake up every morning thinking how to “screw” Mexico”: Peña Nieto

Oct 29, 2016

In an uprecedented public statement by any Mexican President in history, Enrique Peña Nieto declared at the opening ceremony of the “Impulsando a México” Forum: “No me despierto pensando cómo joder a México” (I do not wake up every morning thinking how to “screw” Mexico). Peña Nieto’s reputation has been dented by abuses by security forces, conflict-of-interest scandals and political corruption. It took a fresh hit this summer when he hosted U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump in Mexico City on Aug. 31 for a hastily arranged visit that surprised many members of his cabinet. Trump has long pilloried Mexico, pledging to isolate the country behind a massive border wall and saying the United States’ southern neighbor has been sending rapists and drug smugglers north. Speaking at an event in Mexico City organized by newspaper El Financiero and Bloomberg, Peña Nieto urged an audience of business folk and politicians to take an optimistic view of Mexico, even if that did not mean talking up the government. “In this job, my only intention is for Mexico to do well, and I’m sure that’s all the previous presidents have set out to do, eh?,” said Peña Nieto, who has just over two years of his six-year term left to run. “I don’t think presidents get up, nor have they got up thinking, and forgive me for saying it, how to screw Mexico,” using the word “joder”, a vulgar term with a variety of colloquial uses across the Spanish-speaking world. Surveys show years of corruption scandals and patchy justice have made Mexicans highly skeptical of their politicians, and Pena Nieto’s approval rating slumped to a low of 23 percent in an opinion poll published in August, before the Trump visit. Trump has vowed to make Mexico pay for his border wall, threatened to tear up Mexico’s trade deal with the United States and to deport millions of illegal migrants. Both opponents and supporters of Pena Nieto said the government had played into Trump’s hands with the visit, but the president defended his decision on the grounds that he had to seek dialogue with Trump to protect Mexico’s interests. However, Pena Nieto conceded at the event that the...

CETYS Language Center: Three decades

CETYS Language Center: Three decades

Oct 28, 2016

ALFREDO AZCARATE VARELA EDITOR It was in 1986 that a small group of people headed by Teacher Victor Lopez started the English Language Center (ELC) in CETYS Mexicali, now three decades later, the road stretches ahead. Roberto Rosales and Roberto Hernandez, both CETYS ELC Teachers, starred a festivity in the school’s auditorium, where College English students of the fifth level, delivered interesting talks, covering a wide array of topics and showing how well they have developed their language skills. Teachers and students watched the presentations, and commemorated the first 30 years of a great endeavor, three decades forming and teaching students in order to prepare them to face the global world as well as improve their jobs options, a tradition of teaching excellence that will remain constant and ever...

ELC’s 30 Year History in Short

ELC’s 30 Year History in Short

Oct 27, 2016

By Prof. Joe L. Sanchez, MA Ed. José Luis Sánchez Alcántar is the only survivor of the CETYS Language Center first thirty years, he has been a teacher, a Director and Coordinator, for almost forty years he has devoted his life to teaching and researching better ways to teach the English Language, since 1986 he has been a relevant element in an adventure that started in 1986 in Mexicli, here is his three decade reflexion: The Language Center as we know it nowadays began as such on September 22, 1986. It all started as a project led by then Director of University Extension, Laura Delia Leon. The Center opened its doors for the first time on this date and hosted two classrooms, each with an average of 31 adult students and a total of 63 students enrolled.One year later, Language Center Director, Prof. Victor M. Lopez, as he found out we had 175 students enrolled, stated that we should hold and maintain an average of 200 students saying we would not want disproportionate growth which would hinder the Center from being able to offer high quality English Language Instruction which the Center was required to do hence being part of the best academic institution in Baja California. At that time the teaching staff was made up of 5 English Language Teachers and 1 French Language Instructor and we were sheltered at the CETYS High School building. As time went by and given the success of the project, then Dean of Academic Affairs, Enrique Blancas De La Cruz approached Prof. Lopez with a viable idea for expansion in order to meet the growing demand for English Language Instruction. At the time CETYS University, under the leadership of then University President Alfonso Marin, had plans to expand its facilities and he somehow worked the Language Center into those plans and the whole project got under way in the late 1990’s. Construction of the Language Center was completed in 1999 and staff first moved in at the beginning of the year 2000. If we examine today’s registration data, I can’t help but wonder what our first Director, Prof. Victor M. Lopez would say regarding the growth from...

“Bribery” and lack of ethics, an everyday business in Mexico

“Bribery” and lack of ethics, an everyday business in Mexico

Oct 27, 2016

Business owners pay bribes in order to be successful, says the author of a corruption study, which is why nearly half of Mexican businesses have paid one. The second edition of the study Mexico: Anatomy of Corruption, released this week, revealed that 43% of established businesses have paid bribes for reasons that range from speeding up official procedures to keeping police from bothering them. Business people pay bribes with one goal in mind: to make sure their businesses thrive, said María Amparo Casar, author of the study, which was presented yesterday morning by the non-governmental organization Mexicans Against Corruption and Impunity (MCCI). The study found that 43% of business owners paid bribes to avoid an excessive number of administrative procedures and speed up the process, while 32% paid bribes to obtain permits and licenses and 21% to prevent or impede abuse of authority. Sixteen per cent used bribery for networking — to gain access to contacts and influential people — and 11% to participate in a government bidding process. “We see therefore that entrepreneurs face high costs if they are to enter the market. This explains why Mexico is falling behind in the creation of new businesses when compared to other Latin American countries,” said Casar. According to the poll Fraud and Corruption in Mexico, quoted by Casar in her report, 47% of business owners said that if they didn’t pay bribes official procedures were slower, while 27% said they were given unjustified fines, 21% lost contracts and 7% were left feeling more insecure. The report warns that “we must not consider business as mere victims of corruption, but also as beneficiaries.” Corruption occurs not only due to the fear of the consequences of not paying a bribe, but for greed and lack of ethics in obtaining what the law otherwise prohibits. The study used as an example companies that have no right to a concession but obtain it anyway after paying a bribe. There is also the case of those who don’t meet the requirements to bid for a contract but are spared, or those that don’t offer the best deal but get rid of rivals through legal chicanery. Thus — according to the Global Fraud Survey, also quoted by Casar’s report — 82% of polled executives in Mexico agreed that acts...