Baja California, Possible Site for New Cherenkov Telescope

Baja California, Possible Site for New Cherenkov Telescope

Apr 30, 2015

Mexico is one of two countries on a short list for the construction of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), a project that will be the world’s largest and most sensitive, ground-based gamma-ray observatory. Two sites are to be selected, one in the northern hemisphere and a second, larger installation in the south. The latter will consist of about 100 Cherenkov telescopes.   BC could be site of new telescope project Cherenkov Telescope Array would complement Puebla facility (Click here to read the article published on The Baja Post) Mexico is already the site of the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory (HAWC) situated on a mountain in Puebla. It went into full operation last month. The new observatory will complement HAWC, said the director of the Institute of Astronomy at the National Autonomous University (UNAM). The latter continuously observes a large part of the sky while the CTA observes smaller regions at a higher resolution, said William Lee Alardin. The two locations under consideration for the CTA in the northern hemisphere are La Palma, one of Spain’s Canary Islands, and San Pedro Mártir in Baja California, already the site of the National Astronomical Observatory, operated by UNAM. Southern hemisphere sites in the running are in Chile and Namibia. Requirements are clear and cloudless skies, research infrastructure and a large flat piece of land on which to erect dozens of telescopes. The choice between Mexico and Spain will be made in November and construction, expected to take five years, will begin next year. Twenty-nine countries and 1,000 scientists and engineers are involved in the CTA project.   See more at:...

Mexican Winery “Casta de Vinos” Awarded in Spain

Mexican Winery “Casta de Vinos” Awarded in Spain

Apr 29, 2015

Baja’s Wines Gets Awarded in Spain Casta de Vinos obtained a gold medal during Valladolid’s International Wines and Spirits Contest   During the 14th edition of the International Wines and Spirits Contest in Valladolid, Spain, four Mexican wineries were awarded, however, it was Casta de Vinos from Valle de Guadalupe who took home the gold with its Cardón 2012, a mixture of reds which consist on Syrah, Cabernet, Sauvignon and Mourvèdre. Cardón 2012 is a creation of sommelier Claudia Horta and Casta de Vino’s director and winemaker, Sergio Castañeda. This wine is renown worldwide. Data Sheet: Name: Cardón 2012 Winery: Casta de Vinos, Valle de Guadalupe, Baja California. Grapes: Syrah, Cabernet, Sauvignon and Mourvèdre.  ...

Sea Shepherd Captures Rare Footage of Elusive Vaquita Marina

Sea Shepherd Captures Rare Footage of Elusive Vaquita Marina

Apr 29, 2015

After two years of absence in Mexican waters,  recent sightings of the “vaquita marina” in the northern Gulf of California brings hope to scientific community around the world. The sighting was announced officially by the Secretariat of Environment and Natural Resources (SEMARNAT). On Saturday April 18, Sea Shepherd Conservation Society captured rare footage of the elusive and endangered vaquita porpoise (Vaquita Marina) in the waters of Mexico’s Gulf of California, the small cetacean’s only home on Earth. The sighting marks the first time since 2013 this shy creature has been spotted and filmed in the Sea of Cortez. The vaquita documented by the crew of Sea Shepherd USA’s Operation Milagro (Operation Miracle) campaign is one of only 97 remaining members of its species, considered by many to be the rarest marine mammal in the world. This species lives approximately 20 years, and enters reproductive stage at age 6. Females can only give birth to one specimen during the Spring, probably every two years or so. That means that a female could only have between 5 and 7 offspring throughout their reproductive life, hence the importance of this historic sighting.   Sources: YouTube...

Archaeologist Found Liquid Mercury Under a Pyramid in Teotihuacan

Archaeologist Found Liquid Mercury Under a Pyramid in Teotihuacan

Apr 28, 2015

A Mexican archeologist hunting for a royal tomb in a deep, dark tunnel beneath a towering pre-Aztec pyramid has made a discovery that may have brought him a step closer: liquid mercury. In the bowels of Teotihuacan, a mysterious ancient city that was once the largest in the Americas, Sergio Gómez this month found “large quantities” of the silvery metal in a chamber at the end of a sacred tunnel sealed for nearly 1,800 years. “It’s something that completely surprised us,” Gómez said at the entrance to the tunnel below Teotihuacan’s Pyramid of the Plumed Serpent, about 30 miles (50 km) northeast of Mexico City. Some archeologists believe the toxic element could herald what would be the first ruler’s tomb ever found in Teotihuacan, a contemporary of several ancient Maya cities, but so shrouded in mystery that its inhabitants still have no name. Unsure why the mercury was put there, Gómez says the metal may have been used to symbolize an underworld river or lake. Previously uncovered in small amounts at a few Maya sites much further south, it had never been found in Teotihuacan. Difficult to mine and prized for its reflective properties, mercury was rare in ancient Mexico. Archaeologists believe may have lent it a supernatural significance for ritual ends. ROYAL TOMB SOUGHT Deeper into the complex comprising three chambers, Gómez expects to find the elusive last resting place of a king. If Gómez is right, it could help settle a debate over how power was wielded in Teotihuacan, a city boasting massive stone pyramids that was home to as many as 200,000 people and the heart of ancient empire that flourished between 100 and 700 A.D. Teotihuacan, or “abode of the gods” in the Aztec language of Nahuatl, was distinct from the Mayan civilization. Its inhabitants left behind no written record, abandoning the city long before the Aztecs came to power in the 14th century. Spaniards dug at Teotihuacan in the 1670s, but rigorous scientific excavation of the site did not begin until the 1950s. Gómez’s six-year slog in the tunnel has already yielded tens of thousands of artifacts including stone sculptures, fine jewelry and giant seashells leading to the three...

Earth Day Promotes Environmental Awareness and Calls to Save our Planet

Earth Day Promotes Environmental Awareness and Calls to Save our Planet

Apr 22, 2015

Earth Day’s 45th anniversary could be the most exciting year in environmental history. The year in which economic growth and sustainability join hands. It’s our turn to lead. So our world leaders can follow by example. Earth Day is a name used for 2 similar global observances. While some people celebrate Earth Day around the time of the March Equinox, others observe the occasion on April 22 each year. Earth Day aims to inspire awareness of and appreciation for earth’s environment.   What do people do The April 22 Earth Day is usually celebrated with outdoor performances, where individuals or groups perform acts of service to earth. Typical ways of observing Earth Day include planting trees, picking up roadside trash, conducting various programs for recycling and conservation, using recyclable containers for snacks and lunches. Some people are encouraged to sign petitions to governments, calling for stronger or immediate action to stop global warming and to reverse environmental destruction.  Television stations frequently air programs dealing with environmental issues. Public Life Earth Day is not a public holiday and public life, with regard to transport schedules and opening hours for schools and businesses, is not affected. Background The April 22 Earth Day, founded by Senator Gaylord Nelson, was first organized in 1970 to promote ecology and respect for life on the planet as well as to encourage awareness of the growing problems of air, water and soil pollution. Some people prefer to observe Earth Day around the time of the March equinox. In 1978, American anthropologist Margaret Mead added her support for the equinox Earth Day, founded by John McConnell. She stated that the selection of the March Equinox for Earth Day made planetary observance of a shared event possible. Symbols Symbols used by people to describe Earth Day include: an image or drawing of planet earth; a tree, a flower or leaves depicting growth; or the recycling symbol. Colors used for Earth Day include natural colors such as green, brown or blue. The “Earth Flag”, which was designed by John McConnell, has been described as a “flag for all people”. It features a two-sided dye printed image of the Earth from space on a dark...